Sabattier Effect!

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by Unimaxium, Nov 18, 2004.

  1. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Here's my first attempt at producing an effect that I read about in a book the other day. For those who haven't heard of it, it's called a Sabattier effect. Basically it's like solarization. To make the effect, you expose an image onto printing paper normally, develop it normally, but before putting it though stop bath or fixer, you take the print and expose it again but to plain light (just the light, no negative in the enlarger). Then you go ahead and develop it again, and this time you stop and fix to make the print final. This technique creates sorta-kinda negative effects in some of the parts of the image that weren't developed the first time (since only non-developed parts are still light-sensitive after development). You can find more info on this effect here:
    http://members.tripod.com/~pworkshop/sabattier.htm

    You can notice the effect in almost everything except the guy's hat, which is kind of interesting. The effect is especially visible in the overhead rack (this image was taken on a train).

    Admittedly, this print was done pretty recklessly, hence all the chemical spots and streaks and such. It's actually tricky to get it out of developer, skip stop and fixer, wash it, dry it, put it back onto the print easel, expose it again, and back into developer, without making it spot or streak. I made two prints, and while the second came out a little less spotty, it was darker and had less contrast so I decided to scan this one to post. It's a pretty cool effect, and I hope to do better prints in the future. Critique is welcome, but remember I didn't put a lot of thought into the print this time so yeah there are a lot of things I could have done better if I were being more careful.

    If anyone else has prints with this kind of effect, I would love to see some.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I think this effect is pretty kickin', personally. :D I've read about it too. I have another idea about two to try it, but it involves using Polaroid positive/negative film. Different approach for potentially a similar result.

    If I'd done this first time out, I'd be pleased. You're right: visible streaks on the back of the coat, moving across the print. Can't say it really detracts from the image, though. And the upper part of the image looks great. I'd be pumped to try again if I were you. Good first attempt. :thumbsup:
     
  3. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, I think I've heard of how to do it with polaroids too. You do something like tear the negative and positive parts of the polaroid film apart while they're still developing, exposing them to light before they're done. They have a whole webpage about this effect on their website (although I haven't read much of it) here:
    http://www.polaroid.com/global/prin...DER<>folder_id=282574488338439&bmLocale=en_US
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Without looking at the link, I'm gonna guess it's the same one I looked at a couple months ago. :wink: Supposedly you have a hand-held flash at the ready, and that's your light source for the additional exposure. Sounds like it could be cool, once you get the exposure correct!! Ahh, the downside of working with Polaroid film: every time you blow something, it's another three bucks down the drain! :p (Well, with the 4x5 sheet film, anyway.)

    I hope you try this again and post some more. Can't wait to get my darkroom set up (just got my enlarger) so I can start doing stuff like this, too! :D
     
  5. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Well, if you're talking about the method I used to do it, then I just used the enlarger light to expose the paper the second time (but without the negative in). With the polaroid method, I think they do say to shine a light on it as it's developing, but they don't say necessarily a flash.
     
  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure where I read it, actually. Some alt forum somewhere....I just remember them mentioning use of hand-held flash because with type 55 it's easier to gauge the light.

    Or something. :wink:
     
  7. Saeid

    Saeid TPF Noob!

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    Very nice! Thnx for the insight. :)
    But i have afew questions, the 2nd time when ur exposing it to plain light (with no negative), how many seconds to you expose it? Just 1 or 2? And how bout the aperature? Smallest 1/11 or Largest 1/2?

    Thnx! :)

    P.s. If you dont mind, can u tell us what settings u used for printing, and then the 2nd exposure settings too! Thnx! :)
     
  8. 6Speed

    6Speed TPF Noob!

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    I know this wasn't directed to me, but I will tell ya how I do it.

    I do a test sheet first. Basically I do 3 or 4 second exposure intervals going horizontally across the sheet, then develope, but no stop or fix. Now place back under enlarger without negative and do 3 or 4 second intervals going vertically across the sheet. Finish developing like normal and pick your favorite tone from the grid.
     
  9. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I tried back in high school (20 years) with a few prints and also recently with PS, Do not recall of how I did it then
     
  10. Saeid

    Saeid TPF Noob!

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    Hey, i tried this today, and i actually dried the test strip via the drier before exposing it again, and the effect came out just darker.

    And then i repeated it but from the developer i went to water bath, and straight to the enlarger (without drying it, to prevent any water bubbles or marks to show), exposed it for 4secs with the aperature of F11, and the results were really nice. :) I'll try and post the image here sometime next week. ;)
     
  11. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Posted this somewhere else I think, but I like it...

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Saeid

    Saeid TPF Noob!

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    ok question.... when i tried this, i got good contrast but it was all GRAY, and no white... how can i get white while solarizing?
     

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