scanning film question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by danir, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. danir

    danir No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am thinking of starting to scan some of my pre-digital images.
    How do you scan film? Do you scan the negatives or the prints? Do home scanners do a reasonable job or should I just let a store do it for me?

    Thanks.
    Dani
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2008
  2. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You can get flatbed scanners that can do it.
    You can also buy negative scanners. Lookup the Nikon Coolscans (they rock.. I have one, but not cheap!)
    You can also send the negatives out and have someone else do it professionally.
     
  3. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    No don't let the store do it for you, I've heard of High end labs having ****y results and consumer labs that is garenteed, if you want it done right you have to do it your self.

    Scan the negitives. Scaning prints you have to not only rely on your ability to take the photo correctly you then have to rely on the processing lab to process it right, and cheap labs and some of the more expencive labs fail regularly in this effort. Your digitized image will not be the photo you took and may be unfixable. I can provide ample evidence of that.

    Get your self either a Film enabled flatbed, or a dedicated film scanner. Do not ever just stick your negitives in a standard issue flatbed, It don't work, I can provide ample evidence of that.

    I use a Canon Canoscan 2710 dedicated scaner I bought reasonably cheap on E-bay (I paid less for that than I did my primary film camera).It does have some short commings and I do have some post work to do with it but, it is worth recomending to anyone who is looking to start digitizing their film photography.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2008
  4. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    I like the flatbeds best! There's even one that scans in 14 bpp. An HP model. I like flatbeds because you can put your film-strips (or slides) on and the software will scan, crop, and separate the frames for you in one quick go. Usually 6 or 12 at a time for film strips and 4 or 8 at a time for mounded slides. Makes digitizing a roll (or 10 :D) really easy.
     
  5. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Neg scan scanned at default settings VS flatbed scanned print
    The results from a standard non-film enabled flatbed scanner. I did everything I could to get them right....It can't be done this way. If you are going to go with a flatbed make sure it's film enabled.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2008
  6. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Ohhh that's nice. My Nikon Coolscan just scans a strip at a time... so you're always sticking in a run of 4... waiting 10 mins, sticking in the next one, etc. ZZZzzz....
     
  7. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My Canon is one frame at a time, but it's friggen quick. It only takes me about ten to fifteen minuets to scan an entire roll of film despite one frame at a time.
     
  8. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    But it's automated? That's not bad then if it is. At least better than having to frame each one, white balancing each, scan it in (Twain import etc.) as a single image, and repeat endlessly. I have a few older cool-scans from horse trading but they looked like all they could do were mounted singles - so i never really played much with them.

    What do you guys think of using a slide duplicator on a nice digital camera? I recently made one while the scanner was down and played a little with it. I haven't really tried to put it through its paces yet.

    I might put an image of it up or make a how-to toot if anyone thinks it could be useful.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2008
  9. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That's nice. I think mine takes about 30 minutes per roll, but that's probably in part just because I wind up wandering off while its working and forget to toss the next strip in. :)

    Mine is REALLY old though... It's a Coolscan IV ED I believe... I bought it new for about $1000 back in... 1999? Awesome device though. 2800 dpi with some incredible scratch and dust removal mechanisms.

    Yeah, it is automated. The software that comes with it is horrific, but I learned early on that there is a product called Vuescan which REALLY takes the pain and guesswork out of the batching process. It's a super cheap piece of software and you get perpetual updates to it as well. The interface is a hair on the clunky side, but its AMAZING once you get the hang of it.

    I've heard of people using the slide duplicator thing- never tried it. To be honest, most of my negatives are snapshots taken from a point and shoot... pictures of ex-girlfriends from high-school in bikinis and stuff. :) Certainly something I'd like to keep, but that dead-on flash didn't do great things for the quality of the image beyond the "ooo... hawt" factor. :lol:
     
  10. danir

    danir No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks for that info guys and the demonstrations battou. I guess until I'll wan't to go back to film I'll let some good store do the scanning.

    Dani
     
  11. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Just make sure you take into account that most modern print labs digitize and then print as procedure wether the customer is getting a disk or not, so what you get in print will be what comes on disk.
     
  12. Hawaii Five-O

    Hawaii Five-O My alter-egos have been banned. :( Now I must be

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