Scanning Negatives

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Foxman, Jan 26, 2010.

  1. Foxman

    Foxman TPF Noob!

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    I have read a couple of threads discussing this but am curious.

    I know most people probably just go buy a scanner, but realisticly I am not sure I would be happy with a $100 scanner and can't really afford one much better than that right now. I am considering having some of my stuff from the late 80's early 90's scanned (negatives & slides).

    Whats the best place to go, Local or online and what type of money per scan is reasonable. I met a local shop owner today who suggested .35 per was what he charged, but I have no idea how good his scanner is.

    I am new to this idea so am not real sure what I should be looking for.

    I am hoping to be able to put together a portfolio book with some of my older stuff + my newer digital work. Thoughts?

    If it matters 99.9% would be 35mm mostly negative's some slide's, some B&W mostly color and very few if any would be medium format.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I believe that you can actually get pretty decent results with a relatively innexpensive flatbed scanner, especially if it is actually made with the ability to scan film (with a film holder etc.)
    Sure, the results won't be as good as a dedicated film scanner...but that's up to you to decide.

    I haven't scanned any film (besides a few experiments, many years ago) so maybe someone with more experience can chime in.
     
  3. ChasK

    ChasK TPF Noob!

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    I scanned a 120 negative with a flatbed scanner and got good results. But it is slow. If you had one or two negatives and had a decent scanner ok, but even 5 or 6 would be too time consuming.
     
  4. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My friend made his own with a flatbed scanner. He took an old slide projector and, took out the scanners bulb. Then he set a sheet of paper on the scanner focused and, scanned all of his slides and, negatives. When I saw the setup I laughed but, it actually worked quite well.
     
  5. hossmaster

    hossmaster TPF Noob!

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    Too bad the Nikon Cool Scan V is so expensive! It is an awesome slide/neg scanner. Good thing my work purchased one for "other" reasons.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010
  6. Crissybobissy

    Crissybobissy TPF Noob!

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    One of my all time favorite websites has a negative scanner for 35mm negatives and slides. I'll post a link but I have a love/hate relationship with the site, I can't go there without taking a minute to look around and I almost always end up finding stuff to buy. :sillysmi:

    ThinkGeek :: ImageLab Instant Slide Scanner
     
  7. Foxman

    Foxman TPF Noob!

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    Interesting scanner. 3600 DPI, I am drawing a blank about how that compares to what I get when I shoot with my D80 today.
     
  8. Crissybobissy

    Crissybobissy TPF Noob!

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    Meh, 3600 is a heck of a lot worse quality than what you produce with your D80, but for the price you should be able to print some 8x10's to show your work. It's only 5 megapixels which has me wondering if it's really a scanner or a camera?

    *I just did quick research, it's a camera that takes a photo of your negative*

    Canon has a scanner with a negative tray that has is 9600 DPI for about $120 on Amazon. It's plastic and cheap but apparently does a great job for the price.

    Amazon.com: Canon CanoScan LiDE 700F Color Image Scanner (3297B002): Office Products

    Sorry about my earlier post, I would have posted about the Canoscan if I had realized the Imagelab was essentially nothing more than a close-up camera. I've actually used one of these but thought it was more $$ than this. It does take a while to scan the negative, I think about 10 to 15 seconds?
     
  9. KenC

    KenC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I paid to have a few negatives scanned once when I was between film scanners and had to ask for them to be re-scanned because the guy used such a low resolution that I couldn't even make a good page-size. I think some places assume you are only interested in making proof-size, so be sure to specify resolution if you take this route.
     
  10. NateS

    NateS TPF Noob!

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    I've been reading into this a lot lately. I'm planning on buying some film cameras...probably F100 and some vintage stuff. I want to be able to scan in quality stuff, tweak, and print at the same time.

    I've seen a lot of really good quality scans being done by the Epson 4490 Scanner. It comes with film/negative holders and software for scanning. They don't make them anymore from what I understand so you might have to get it second hand or find somebody with some left over...but it could probably be had for the $100-150 range.

    Epson | Perfection 4490 Photo Scanner | B11B176011 | B&H Photo

    Search Flickr for Epson 4490 and you'll see a bunch of photos tagged that were scanned in using that scanner....that's what I did and it kind of sold me on the cheap solution.
     
  11. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not true at all, 3600dpi is actually significantly higher resolution than a d90.

    35mm at 3600dpi = 5040 x 3402 or 17.4 megapixels in digital terms

    And those pixels aren't bayer interpolated which increases resolution even further.

    I scan all my negatives at 3200dpi because anything higher exceeds the resolution quality of the film.
     
  12. Millie.T.Cook

    Millie.T.Cook TPF Noob!

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    Hi there.

    I love a great photo when I see it. I was curious what format is the best to store my photos in? RAW or Jpeg or any others?

    MC


    ________________________________
    Everyone needs an internet fax service.
     

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