Screen Vs Eyepiece Composition. You Decide.

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by gardenshed, Jan 18, 2007.

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Do you prefer to compose using your screen or your eyepiece?

  1. Screen

    1 vote(s)
    7.7%
  2. Eyepiece

    12 vote(s)
    92.3%
  1. gardenshed

    gardenshed TPF Noob!

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    Many photographers are finding that the ability to compose via screen gives an added freedom to the process.

    That the eyepiece is constricting and conspicuous in certain circumstances.

    Feelings? Are you using your screen more than your eyepiece? When? And are you one of those who would go DSLR if it had a decent preview capacity?
     
  2. castrol

    castrol TPF Noob!

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    When I am using my P&S Canon, I turn the screen off and use the eyepiece
    to compose simply to save battery life. It's amazing how much longer it will
    shoot when you do it that way.

    I am still amazed at how many people can't figure out how to look through
    the eyepiece on either one of my cameras. I tell them it is just like a regular
    camera and they continue to hold it out in front of them saying..."I can't
    see anything, what's wrong?"
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My digital camera (DSLR) does not allow the use of the LCD screen for composing...and I prefer it that way. When I look through the viewfinder, I'm looking into a mirror and right out the lens....no electronic interference.

    I actually find it funny when I see people composing their shots with their camera out at arms length. That's posibly the worst way to hold a camera because any shake will be amplified. One bonus of looking though the viewfinder is that you can press the camera against your face and keep your arms against your body for stability.
     
  4. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    +1 here.
     
  5. Arch

    Arch Damn You! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    +2 ;)
     
  6. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    +3

    the only advantage of the LCD is awkward angles. And I think we've all been in the position of letting freinds use an SLR who didn't know that you have to look through the viewfinder. One time, i let a freind take a few pictures at a football game with my 80-200 f/2.8 and SB-600 on my body and she was holding it at arms length trying to compose with the LCD. It was funny but a little embarrasing.
     
  7. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    I agree holding the camera against your face definatly gives you more stability. Also I dont think any DSLRs allow you to view the shot through the screen. Its odd how people who once used a regular camera and had to look through the viewfinder now compose through the screen on their digital point and shoot. I believe Ive even seen some newer point and shoots that do not even have eyepieces.
     
  8. gardenshed

    gardenshed TPF Noob!

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    You can get just as much stability viewing via the screen, it's just a matter of triangulation as it is when you're flattening your nose in the good old fashioned way. The camera should never be held at arms length, naturally. I don't know what that is about unless people were comparing taken shots with the reality. But then, the numbner of DSLR users I see with their arms sticking out sideways like tourists doesn't fill me with confidence for their stability either.

    I find I can shoot and talk to a subject, as with a TLR, which is a great help. And having that much more peripheral vision in a changing location is also very useful.

    Why don't top end DLRs have preview screens? I'd appreciate a shift up from my old Finepixes, but the revelation of a decent alternative to the Conk-Squasher holds me back.
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    DSLR cameras have an actual shutter that covers the sensor, just like a shutter would cover the film....unlike digi-cams, which have light hitting their sensors all the time. I think this is one of the factors in why a DSLR has a much shorter shutter lag.

    I don't know if it's available yet...but I read somewhere that someone is developing a DSLR with an extra sensor that would be used to generate a preview on the LCD.
     
  10. seanberry

    seanberry TPF Noob!

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    I believe one of the Olympus offers live preview on the screen, it may be a yet to be released model, but I know I've read it somewhere. I also prefer using the viewfinder. The battery life on my mom's camera (when using the LCD) is horrendous, but using the Viewfinder significantly lengthens that. The only time I don't like the VF is when my contact isn't seated right (blurry) or I'm wearing my glasses, otherwise it's perfect for me!
     
  11. gardenshed

    gardenshed TPF Noob!

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    Sorry, I won't be convinced to return to routinely squashing my nose up against a camera back again, not in my line of work.
    Using my screen makes it so much easier to see other shots developing - and occasionally avoid the odd flying brick. The ultimate viewing screens are the tiltable ones which allow all kinds of angles which would be hardly practicable with a viewfinder.
    As for battery life, that's a paltry price to pay for the added flexibility.
    Stability is always a quaestion of triangulation, and this is just as achievable using the screen as a viewfinder. The nose is not a vital aid in this.
    I really recommend that confirmed eyepiece addicts try a camera with a screen for general social and impromptu shoots. There is a definite difference to be made.
     
  12. shingfan

    shingfan TPF Noob!

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    i think the shooting style depends on a person's preference....most ppl who uses P&S nowadays....they dont care too much about quality......is all about convenience......why the use of LCD screen for preview......for those who use the viewfinder.....obvious...they are aiming at quality....different perspective i think....no right or wrong.....this is another reason why they only provide LCD preview on P&S but not DSLR (althoguht i think there is one or two DSLR with this capability...which i think is kinda stupid....holding such a big camera away looking at the LCD screen would introduce a lot of hand shake and make image blur)

    so i'll say this poll is not quite complete....it should also separate P&S and DSLR

    for me....

    P&S ---> Screen
    DSLR ---> view finder
     

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