Self Portrait C&C

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by MushroomPirate, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. MushroomPirate

    MushroomPirate TPF Noob!

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    Hi Everyone,
    I've been looking through these forums for a while now. I just got my first DSLR a few weeks ago and I've just been playing around with it. I realized I enjoy taking portrait photos. I have these fabrics stored away, so I take them out and use them as backgrounds, and use two Ikea lights for lighting. Haha, obviously not optimal, but this is what I have. I'm shooting with a Nikon D5000 and a 18-105 f/3.5-5.6 lens. Slightly edited in Photoshop.
    I would like some advice on how to improve. Please be as critical as you can be, I know this isn't great and there is something I can improve on.
    Thanks!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. thirdkid

    thirdkid TPF Noob!

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    thats a pretty cool self portrait..its not like everyone elses self portrait..:thumbup:
     
  3. linpelk

    linpelk TPF Noob!

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    I'm really no lighting expert, so I can't help you there, but ironing the sheets would be helpful to your image. I noticed the wrinkles right away. I like your composition and attitude.
     
  4. camz

    camz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    yeah...the first thing I noticed are the wrinkles on the sheet. I would either iron it or blur it out. Personally I would slightly blur it out which gives a cool effect and make you stick out a bit more.

    Second...I see shadows in your face. I don't know if that's the look your going for but since the sheets are more illuminated then you are it definetely throws me off.

    Third...there's no focal point. The sheets are attracting attention just as much as the shadows and just as much as you the subject.

    but pretty good for shooting with your first DSLR! Good improvision on the ikea lights. I'm a natural light shooter so i'm think your light years ahead of me:D. I wouldn't know how to setup two flashes for the life of me.
     
  5. c.cloudwalker

    c.cloudwalker TPF Noob!

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    Step away from the fabric as far as you can to lessen the shadow on it.

    And I also agree with ironing the fabric. Either that or make it more wrinkled.

    BTW, your lighting is not bad at all.
     
  6. MushroomPirate

    MushroomPirate TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the advice and comments, I'll make sure to iron the fabric next time. Thanks for the tip on standing a bit farther back to make myself the focal point, I'll try that next time.
    Also, camz, all I really did with the two Ikea lights were put them in different places until the lighting looked decent, I actually don't have any experience with setting up lights and all that either. I'm sure you have some sort of lamp lying around soemwhere, you should give it a try, it's probably been my favorite thing to do with my DSLR. :)
     
  7. musicaleCA

    musicaleCA TPF Noob!

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    Strobist: Lighting 101

    Read that and you'll be well on your way to understanding light. You can do a lot by just varying the light-subject and light-background distances. Moving yourself and the light away from the background will give you more fall-off and make the background darker.
     

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