setting up a dark room

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by nomav6, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

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    I've been working some OT at work, so I think Im going to have some extra money to start setting up a darkroom at my house, can someone list the things that Im going to need? this is only going to be the most basic darkroom and I do have a pretty limited budget :(
     
  2. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

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    I forgot to add that Im mostly worried about developing right now, will start doing prints later once I can afford an enlarger.
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    For developing film:

    2+ 1 gallon jugs
    developing tank with reels
    thermometer
    measuring cups or graduated cylinders
    scissors
    bottle cap opener (for 35mm film)
    developer
    stop bath
    fixer
    hypo-clear or wash aid
    photo flo or dish washing detergent
    a string and clothes pins to hang the film to dry
    neg sheets for storage

    I think that's everything. I probably forget something...

    Edit: Some sort of timer
     
  4. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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    I actually managed to get 90% if that in working order of ebay for about £60...including enlarger!
     
  5. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    You use stop bath for film?! :p :roll:

    sorry still holding a grudge...
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Keeps the fixer fresh! I use a much weaker mix than usually recommended. Mostly water with just a splash of stop.
     
  7. Saeid

    Saeid TPF Noob!

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    I would also suggest easy access to a sink (water and drain), since u need to wash ur film and paper!

    Oh and umm... safety light...!!!

    And a good spot to hang ur prints to dry (negatives), if ur not using a dry roller... which i dont recommend... since it can burn mat paper! Well that happened to me... but hey! ;)
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Oh yeah, you definately need a safe light. I knew I forgot something. :lol:

    While easy access to a sink is nice, it's not absolutely necessary. I didn't have a sink in my darkroom for years. Once the film or prints are fixed, they are light safe, so I'd take them out to the kitchen to wash. I'd hold my prints in a water bath until I was ready to wash.

    I hang my film from a clothes line in my darkroom. I use clothes pins to clip it and weight it. I dry my prints face down on a screen I made myself.
     
  9. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That's why I call you "the Pilgrm", honey, cause you're an awesome little DIY'er.... :wink:

    Can't wait to get my darkroom going too.
     
  10. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    It also stops development (hence the name) and - more importantly - kills the developer so it doesn't carry over into the fix. This can cause dichroic fog - silver being put down on the surface of your print and degrading the image.
     
  11. Saeid

    Saeid TPF Noob!

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    I just wash my prints in water, between the developer and fixer! (also doesnt kill the fixer!)

    But then again with most of the fixers on the market today, there really isnt a point to a stop bath! dont u agree?
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I disagree. I regularly test my fixer, and it exhausts much more quickly with a water bath than a stop bath. I know that many folks don't use stop, but for me fixer is the most expensive of the chemistry I use; the stop pays for itself ten times over with fixer cost savings. I'm not really worried about immediately stopping the development process, but if I can make my fixer last longer I can save hundreds of dollars in a year. And then I can buy more camera gear :D

    EDIT: I thought of something else. Since i take my fixer to the local pro lab to dump it through their filter, if my fixer has less capacity that means I've got to drag it over there more often. I go through a lot of chemistry, anywhere that I can extend the usefulness and lower the cost I'm on it.
     

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