Shakey

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by picture_this07, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. picture_this07

    picture_this07 TPF Noob!

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    Right now I have a Dinky Kodak Z710, and my hands tend to shake a little. Because a DSLR camera shoots quicker will that eliminate the blur? or Should I just buy a Image Stablized carmera?

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You really need to understand the basics of exposure to know why you get shakey shots.

    Basically, there are three things that control exposure. Aperture (size of hole in lens), shutter speed and ISO.

    The particular settings for these variables is dependant on the amount of light that you have. Some cameras (all DSLR) will show you these settings even before you shoot...well at least the aperture and shutter speed. There is a rule of thumb about shutter speed and blurry photos. With 35mm film cameras, the rule was that you wanted to have a shutter speed that was the same number or higher, than the focal length of the lens. So if, for example, you had a 50mm lens, you would need a shutter speed of at least 1/50.

    I'm not sure how that rule translates to your camera, but the basic idea is that when it's not very bright (indoors, for example)...you need to watch your shutter speed...and if it's too slow, you should avoid shooting with the camera in your hands.

    Getting back to the variables...in the auto mode, when it gets dim, the camera will set the largest aperture (smallest F number), which will give you a faster shutter speed. However, that may not be enough to prevent blur...so the next thing you can do, is turn up the ISO setting. However, this will increase the digital noise in the images. Of course, you could add more light...turn of the flash for example.

    Now, a DSLR is absolutely a better camera...but it is subject to the same rules. A slow shutter speed while shooting hand held, will mean blur. There are advantages though. Firstly, with a DSLR, you can change the lens to a lens with a larger maximum aperture, which will allow a faster shutter speed. Also, DSLR cameras have a sensor that is much larger than what you will find in 99% of non-SLR digital cameras...this (among other things) will mean less noise at higher ISO settings. You may find that ISO 400 on your camera, makes so much noise that it's not usable. You may have higher settings byt they will be worse. A modern DSLR camera can shoot at ISO 800, 1600 or even 3200...with as much or less noise than a digi-cam at ISO 400. So this means that you get a faster shutter speed when you need it.
     

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