Shooting Green Mountains (Suggestions)

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by ravikiran, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. ravikiran

    ravikiran TPF Noob!

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    Hai everyone,

    I am going on a tour in a few days to Papi mountains. We would be travelling on a steamer boat on the River Godavari which wounds and passes swiftly in this mountain range. Either sides of the river you find nothing but green mountains. I am very fond of the place and so arranged it as my first trip after I got my DSLR (Nikon D50). Unfortunately I didn't get all my lens. I presently got D50 and the Kit lens 18-55mm. I have ordered for an 50mm f/1.8 and a 70-300mm, which might not arrive by the time I start.
    So please suggest me about the settings to shot the Beautiful mountains and the magnificient landscapes with my 18-55mm lens. Most of the views will be better when we are on the steamer. So I have to take most of the shots from a moving steamer, ofcourse at a very less speed (10-15 km/hr). I am a newbie and am still learning the necessary terminology and experimenting with different settings. Still I would like to make this trip a success in terms of photography. Waiting for your suggestions (if possible lessons).
    Thank you in advance,

    amiably,
    Ravi Kiran.

    PS: Dear Moderator, I don't know whether I can post such a request in this sub forum. But I thought that this is the place where most of the Nature loving photographers will be present. Please excuse me if I posted in the place.
     
  2. JTHphoto

    JTHphoto TPF Noob!

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    Ravi,

    I would imagine that the slow speed of the steamer will have very little effect on the quality of your shots. I would think that anything that would be blurry, you wouldn't be able to handhold anyway. Just keep checking your shots to make sure you are shooting fast enough.

    I would imagine that your kit lens is going to the be the one you would use for landscape shots anyway, because of the wider angle you will need to use to capture the large scenes & mountains.

    You might want to try to pick up a circular polarizer, which will decrease the reflections on the foliage/water. This enhances the colors in your photography. It also darkens up the sky, so watch how much you adjust it, so it doesn't get overdone. I just took some fall shots this weekend and some of my skies turned out black.

    As for settings, I switch it up a lot, just to learn how the camera works, and reacts in different situations. I usually take a few shots in "landscape" mode, but then switch over to manual. Try an aperature of F8, sometimes it will make your image a touch sharper, depending on the lens. Watch your ISO, as long as you have plenty of light and can keep your shutter speed up I would keep it as low as possible (100?) to reduce a grainy appearance. Other than that, just make sure you take along plenty of storage, shoot A LOT, and share when you get back!
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I agree.
     
  4. ravikiran

    ravikiran TPF Noob!

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    Thank you JTH for the big reply. I would like to try a circular polarizer. But I don't think I can get one readily in my town. Anyhow I shall give it a trial. I shall try to get as many shots as possible (and expect atleast a few of them are good). That alone shall make my trip a success. Thank you once again.
     

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