shooting highschool football and what lens?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by DeepSpring, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    I'm the photographer for the schools news paper (and year book..... and im not in either clas hehe) so I have ben asked to shoot the homecoming game. By the time the game comes around I'll have a Rebel XT, the ki lens from my rebel k2, and I was planning on buying a 50mm when I get the XT. Do you think those lenses will be suitable? Or do I need something with longer reach? Now I will be able to stand on the sidelines since I have a press pass, and since The photos wont need to be that big (I was thinking of also hosting them online and seeing if any of the players wanted to buy some of them) I could get away with cropping alittle but and still getting a nice 8x10.

    And if anyoen has any tips in general for shooting football? iso settings, obviously fastest shutter and widest aperature


    thanks you
     
  2. dsp921

    dsp921 TPF Noob!

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    They play during the day or after dark where you are? You'll most likely need a 300mm or 400mm, f/2.8 would be good, might get by with f/4 especially if they play in the afternoon. Good to a couple of games before the homecoming and see what your up against, shooting football isn't the easiest of sports to capture.
     
  3. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    Isn't a 400mm too much to capture "scenes"? If you want individual players it makes sense, but if you want a scene, what would be the "right"
    size? Recall the he's on the sidelines.

    I think that indeed it would be best if you'd do a couple of practice runs even when the team practices. Take any point and shoot with a wide lens (at the wide lens end) and make a note of the equivalent 35mm focal length. Take pictures even evertyhing would look small. Then home in Photoshop figure out what would have been a good focal lenght for that shot.

    M.
     
  4. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    my highschool is sadly the only school left in the valley that does not have lights... BUT WE WILL HAVE THEM NEXT YEAR!!!! so because of this most of our games are away so I don't really have any home games to practice at before homecoming. But for homecoming we are renting those gigantic lights to put next to the field so it can be at night.

    I don't see myself being able to buy a 300 or 400 f/2.8 by the time of the game
     
  5. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    What?! You're doing yearbook photos and you're no willing to drop $8000 on a lens for a Rebel XT? :roll:

    Seriously though, I shoot the same stuff and I feel limited by the 50mm. A lens you might want to look into is the 100mm f/2. It'll just be a tad slower, but it should be long enough to get the shots when you consider the conversion factor.

    High iso, wide-open, fast shutters. They move fast
     
  6. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    $375 is a tad to much at the moment. After I get the camera i'll try and get that but just not at the moment. I also dont want to drop $300 on a decent lens just to get this now I rather wait and spend $500 on something much better.

    With my kit lens and the crop factor it will appear to be about a 144mm lens, still at f/5.6 zoomed in all the way.

    How dark is a football field really tho? Everything I am going to capture will be under extremely bright lights creating day time to the field.
     
  7. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    you'll be lucky to get good results using a lens that is only a 4.5 at best. You'll have to go to such a high ISO to be able to use shutter speeds capable of capturing motion and your pictures will end up pretty noisy. You could just wait for the play to get close to you but that will vastly limit your ability to capture great images as they happen. I would suggets getting a decent flash that may help freeze motion when players are close and you'll need one anyway if you looking to pursue photography. I think the 100mm f/2 sounds good you will be able to capture way more although the length will not be enough to get close ups though. Shooting sports at night really calls for a 2.8 and those are expensive. also realize you may want to get a higher vantage point so a long lense would be beneficial for that as well. If your kit lens is the 80-200/4.5-5.6 no way at 200mm will 5.6 be enough.
     
  8. dsp921

    dsp921 TPF Noob!

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    I think you'll find the 100 too short. Even on the sidelines the play is often 25 yards away minimum, and usually more. Head down field and wait for the play to come to you. That's where knowing the game and what to expect next help a lot. Know when a pass is likely, when to expect a run, etc. Scenes are probably not the best way to shoot football. You'll want to bring the action close, zoom in on 3 or 4 players and be able to see the ball. I shoot a lot of youth sports, mainly lacrosse and soccer and even on the smaller field the kids are on a 200mm is limiting.
    At night under the lights a flash with help a lot, but it has to be a decent one, unless the play comes to you the subjects are going to be a ways away.
    Search around some of the forums, I think you'll see that most will agree that shooting football under lights is difficult at best. I know you're shooting Canon, but there is a lot of football talk going on at the Nikon Cafe. Check out a few of the threads here: http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/forumdisplay.php?f=102
    You're best bet is to rent some long fast glass.
    This looks easy until you try it. Practice at away games if you can. Even if you can't get right on the sidelines, get as close as you can. That should eliminate at least a few surprises.


    Just saw these and thought they might help:
    http://www.sportsshooter.com/message_display.html?tid=21887
    http://www.sportsshooter.com/special_feature/2004_luau_video/shooting_football/index.html
     
  9. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for all the replies. I'll try and get to a practice or away game before Homecoming.

    Now I just need to sell more candy at school :) and try to get a longer/faster lens.
     
  10. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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  11. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    I think your are going to find 180mm is too short. Your really going to need at least 300mm and Im not even considering the effect a dslr has on length Im saying you need a 300mm lens for your DSLR if your talking conversion then you need at least 450mm. You could rent one for a night to see if you like it although to rent a 400mm 2.8 you may need an $8000 deposit so that may be out of the question. A monopod will be needed as well at thos elong focal lengths, you could use a tripod but those are hard to run around with and if your going to be shooting sports you may want to move around the field a lot to get interesting perspectives. I would say go to any HS sporting event at night asap and try to use your current lenses see the results if you like them than no problem if not though you will know what you need. Do you have a photography class at your school. If you do speak with the teacher I bet he/she couldloan you a lens if its for school purposes.
     
  12. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    Yes we do have a photography class thats a good idea, except for that the photography class is pretty bad and they dont really have any equipment at all from what my friend whos in it tells me. Ok well thanks for all the replies I really appreciate it. My dreams of football photography might have to be put on hold until next year
     

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