Shooting Kitchens?

Discussion in 'Commercial/Product photography' started by joecoulsonphotography, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. joecoulsonphotography

    joecoulsonphotography TPF Noob!

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    Anyone else on here shooting kitchen installations or interior home shots?
     
  2. Dubious Drewski

    Dubious Drewski TPF Noob!

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    Use a wide lens? What are you asking? There's nearly nothing to respond to in this post. This is why no one is likely to respond, besides me.
     
  3. floor6

    floor6 TPF Noob!

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    i've got no experience of shooting kitchens but maybe it's worth mentioning there are a few shiny/reflective things in kitchens (fridges, ovens, metal surfaces, marble tops)..so diffuse light could be useful as well as direct sunlight through the windows 'lifestyle' pictures. flash or some hardlight sources might create problems. i'd do some wide-angle but also get a few close-up 'macro'-(style) details to mix-things up graphically if the imagery is meant for brochures.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2008
  4. joecoulsonphotography

    joecoulsonphotography TPF Noob!

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    Dubious: I was trying to strike up conversation about something that someone else may have in common with me. Thanks for responding.

    floor6: Thanks for the response, yes those shiny objects are a pain (especially glass!!) but I have found that soft boxes (like you mentioned) combined with a polarizer can be your best friends. I shoot wide angle and correct distortion in PS. The most tricky is the different sources of light i encounter. In one kitchen I can get the following types of light: Natural (both overcast and sunny) halogen, flourescent and of course my lights. I use capture NX to balance out different tones within an frame with control points. Anyway, I was just wondering if anyone else dealt with these circumstances.
     
  5. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I did several kitchens back in the film days, but had a HUGE advantage... they were actually sets built in the factory. My client was the cabinet manufacturer. Everything was shot with hot lights on 4x5 transparency. The biggest problem was getting enough amperage to power the lights. I had to bring in a generator.

    I still do interiors on a regular basis, but only an occasional kitchen. Digital has made things quite a bit easier for me.

    -Pete
     

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