shooting M mode --need advice

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by kalyankkumar, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    Hi,

    I have recently started shooting on M mode....I got to know the definition of aperture,shutter speed,ISO,lighting meter etc.......so in M mode i started experimenting with different settings...

    When shooting landscapes i am using different AV setting from 6 to 22 ...ISO also..but before taking picture i look at light meter and adjust it to be in the middle to have correct exposure.........is this the correct approach to take pics........Please help me
  2. CouncilmanDoug
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    CouncilmanDoug Active Member

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    yes?
  3. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    should i always check the light meter before taking picture...but when i adjust the light meter it also changes other settings rt?
  4. o hey tyler
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    o hey tyler New Member

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    Yes, always check your light meter before you take photos, unless you get good at eyeballing exposure. You're changing settings to adjust the light meter. You have control over your Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO.

    I suggest you look up the exposure triangle.
  5. STM
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    STM New Member

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    Shutter speed and aperture are always in an inverse relationship. If the light and ISO remain the same, as you change one, you always have to change the other (in an equal and opposite direction) to ensure the same amount of light is reaching the film or sensor. It is known as "equivalent exposures". On the older Hasselblad "C" lenses, when you set the shutter speed and aperture on the lens, they lock together, so when you move the knurled ring, although you are changing one, the other changes equally to compensate for it.

    And in the manual mode, just like any automatic mode, by always centering your exposure meter you are always trusting your meter that it knows what it is doing, which about half the time, it does not. It is never a good idea to just blindly follow your meter's recommendations for every situation.
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  6. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    Thank you o hey tyler
    ......i have just started taking pictues on M mode.....I read some articles about exposure triangle and also attended a session on taking [FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]photographs[/FONT] in manual mode......i have some idea about it......but when i started taking photos.......

    After making changes to
    Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO....if we cahnge light meter ...will it change the previous Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO to allow/reduce light....does it messup with the settings we made before
  7. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    thanks STM
    ....if i understand it correctly.......if i am taking a picture of landscape....and if i put aperture @ 16 ......and check the light meter ...if its underexposed/over exposed... i need to change the shutterspeed or ISO......and NOT adjust light meter to correct the exposure

    Did i get it correct......?
  8. o hey tyler
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    o hey tyler New Member

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    By changing the shutter speed or ISO, you are changing the light meter. If you want a large Depth of Field for a landscape shot, and you're shooting on f/16, you're changing your shutter speed and/or ISO to properly expose the scene.
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  9. Vtec44
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    Vtec44 New Member

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    Also, it's helpful if you know the Zone System when metering using natural light.
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  10. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    Thanks Vtec44..Zone System is new to me ill find more info on it..
  11. ph0enix
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    ph0enix TPF Supporters

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    You're not changing the light meter. You're adjusting aperture and shutter speed until the meter indicates correct exposure.
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  12. kalyankkumar
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    kalyankkumar New Member

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    If you want a large Depth of Field for a landscape shot, and you're shooting on f/16, you're changing your shutter speed and/or ISO to properly expose the scene................i was checking light meter after i set aperture to f/16...and adjust light meter to be in middle.....:grumpy:
  13. STM
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    STM New Member

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    Two thumbs up there buddy, no truer words were ever spoken. I don't give a hoot how "sophisticated" any camera's metering system is, it still does not know what the photographer wants (assuming that he or she even does, which could be a pretty big if) out of that scene.

    A thorough working knowledge of AA's Zone System and a 1 degree spot meter will outperform any camera meter 100% of the time.
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  14. STM
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    STM New Member

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    Basically, but honestly I would not get in the habit of changing ISO as a way of adjusting exposure. Use shutter speed and aperture instead.
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  15. BlackSheep
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    BlackSheep Well-Known Member

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    Think of it this way - if you are setting up a new stereo, setting the aperature and shutter speed is like getting the balance right between the two speakers.
    Changing the ISO is like turning the volume up or down.
    And when you start getting into fine tuning the Depth of Field for specific situations (i.e. landscape vs macro), that's like adjusting the bass vs the treble to get the specific sound you want.
  16. manaheim
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    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member

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    "M mode"

    Someone please shoot me.
  17. Garbz
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    Garbz New Member

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    What is your goal here? Are you trying to master your camera and then intend to go back to one of the automatic modes? If your grand goal was to forever adjust manual settings to match your lightmeter then I ask why bother? It's only going to slow you down.
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  18. Dao
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    Dao Well-Known Member

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    But ... What I read from other forum members (I am not talking about OP here), they looks very cool and professional when telling others they shoot all manual because they have total control on the camera settings even if they just dial to zero.
  19. Ysarex
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    Ysarex Well-Known Member

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    Switching the camera to full manual adds a couple extra inches, I mean mm, to your zoom. It's mm envy plain and simple.

    Joe
  20. manaheim
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    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member

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    My (more serious) advice to the OP... is shoot in Manual when you are not getting the results you want from other "automated" modes.

    Oftentimes people feel like either they "should" be shooting in Manual, or it's somehow "cheating" to use other modes, and that's really not the case. Shooting in Manual is no cooler and no less cheating than focusing manuallly... being able to change ISOs on the fly... or even, really, using digital instead of film.

    Any and all of these things are technologies. They are capabilities that exist now that did not exist in the past. You use them as needs dictate.

    Now it is certainly true that putting the camera into a more automated mode is allowing the camera to make choices for you, but the question for you is could you make a better choice? If you can, then you are doing yourself a disservice. If you can't, then you have either more to learn or tougher pictures to take before you need it.

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