Shooting the Moon

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by ZakAttack, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. ZakAttack

    ZakAttack TPF Noob!

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    I want to be able to take awesome shots of the moon and stars someday. As of right now this is the best I can do. PLEASE tell me what will make this better!!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. oldnavy170

    oldnavy170 TPF Noob!

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    I know this just from being on this forum.......TRIPOD, TRIPOD, TRIPOD!!!! :)
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    :thumbup: good advice.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The moon is directly lit by the sun...so the sunny 16 rule should apply...or at least give you a place to start with your exposure. If you don't know that rule...look it up.
     
  5. Shakka Brah

    Shakka Brah TPF Noob!

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    ^You positive on that one? It makes sense but seems kind of like a moon shot... I just had to say it. But seriously it seems wierd. I could see it working just as easily as not working
     
  6. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    (1) Tripod.
    (2) Lower the ISO and do a longer exposure, now that you have a tripod.
    (3) Toy with the exposure time (assuming you're digital) to figure out one that is right for that moon phase. On a full moon, a 1/250 sec shot is usually good (don't know the f-stop for that off the top of my head, though).
     
  7. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Your image is over exposed and has camera shake. Also the focal length of the lens is too short to bring up much detail. Make a note of Mike's input above. Shooting the moon is like shooting at high noon on a sunny day. Ignore your meter. But it takes a long, long lens. The darn thing is a long way away.
     
  8. dirtnapper

    dirtnapper TPF Noob!

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    I have had good luck with these:


    Exp ISO f/stop
    1/125 100 5.6
    1/250 100 8
    1/350 100 3.5
     
  9. Reverend

    Reverend TPF Noob!

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    Now that's just silly.

    I took this handheld.

    [​IMG]

    Full size at http://photo.cardork.com/albums/Landscapes-Nature/IMG_9511.jpg

    Camera Make: Canon
    Camera Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT
    Image Date: 2006:10:06 20:07:11
    Flash Used: No
    Focal Length: 200.0mm
    CCD Width: 6.58mm
    Exposure Time: 0.0004 s (1/2500)
    Aperture: f/2.8
    ISO equiv: 200
    White Balance: Auto
    Exposure: Manual
    Exposure Mode: Manual
     
  10. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    Not everyone has such a fast lens. For slower lenses, a longer exposure is necessary and you can get just as good a shot. And at high magnification, it's very difficult for most people to hold a camera steady enough to have no blurring even at 1/250 sec. So getting a cheap little tripod for this is not "just silly."
     
  11. Reverend

    Reverend TPF Noob!

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    I understand that, but you can also crank up the ISO to help with the exposure time.
     
  12. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    This is another case where, in my experience, I would not recommend upping the ISO. Since you're effectively looking at a very bright object against a black background, upping the ISO even a bit will usually bring out quite a bit more noise in the black background (though this could be relatively easily PhotoShopped out). So again, if you can afford to spend $30, I recommend getting a tripod, cranking down the ISO to minimum, opening up the aperture most of the way, and taking a longer exposure.
     

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