Should I buy a SLR Camera?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by go4saket, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. go4saket

    go4saket TPF Noob!

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    Hello friends!

    I am not a pro photographer nor do I intend to be one. I like clicking pictures, specially of family and stuff. I dont have much idea about photography stuff and at present have a Sony Cybershot DSC-P200.

    Since some time I am very much interested in buying a decent SLR camera as a few friends told that pictures taken from a SLR are far more superior. As I am not much into photography stuff and as I have very limited knowladge about all this, should I or shouldnt I go for a SLR camera.

    If pictures are much better and one doesnt need to be technically very strong to use a SLR, I dont mind buying one. So which one should I go for, Canon or Nikon and which model. As I am just a starter, I dont want to invert a fortune on it but on the otherhand dont want to buy any dying technology. I saw reviews of a few like Nikon D60, D40x & D40, but couldnt decide.

    So please recommend me a good camera.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Rogan

    Rogan TPF Noob!

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    whats your budget :) ?
     
  3. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    If you don't intend to invest too much into photography, you're probably best off going with the D40 (or D60 if you feel like spending the extra cash) and kit lens.
     
  4. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    No, sorry. If you don't already know why you need one it will likely just get in your way.
     
  5. Applefanboy

    Applefanboy TPF Noob!

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    In unexperienced hands, a DSLR is just as bad as a p&s but if you have a passion for photography and are willing to learn, just get one. Oh, and go with the D40.
     
  6. keith204

    keith204 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I'd say go for a nice point-and-shoot. I'm all about DSLRs, but they're not for everybody. Your friends who told you that DSLRs are far superior are partially right. If you have the money to invest in glass, have the time and want to learn the features, and don't mind a camera that takes a backpack, then a DSLR will help you get better results.

    From the sounds of your needs, I'd recommend a Canon S5-IS, or the Nikon equivalent (nikon users kick in here). A coworker got a S5-IS, and it has an exceptional zoom range, takes sharp pictures, has IS for low light, a very easy auto mode for his wife, yet it still lets him be creative by offering many manual features, as well as a hot-shoe for mounting a larger flash if desired.

    DSLRs are now "the thing" and everybody thinks they become an instant photographer because they have a DSLR. Don't dare fall into this if you don't plan on spending a good sum of money on quality glass.
     
  7. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Keith is right, you can get a DSLR and a budget lens, but with that you will get budget results. The top end glass costs money - and yes with the top end lenses (and some practice) a DSLR will outperform a point and shoot - but it costs in money and time - learning to use the camera.

    From what you have said I also agree that a point and shoot might be much better suited to you - or possibly a bridge camera (has some of the customisable settings of a DSLR without the changable lenses). That way you can have a try at more advanced shooting and progress from there if you choose to
     
  8. dEARlEADER

    dEARlEADER TPF Noob!

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    I don't believe either of the last two posts.

    You can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens and smoke any point and shoot on iso performance alone. An extra $100 bucks gets you a hotshoe flash so you can take excellent indoor evening shots by directing your flash upward(bouncing).

    You can leave your DSLR in an auto mode with excellent results for what you are looking for. Later on, you may become more interested in photography and with a DSLR will have the features to grow.
     
  9. penfold1

    penfold1 TPF Noob!

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    i think a canon S5 IS fills the averages users needs and he doesnt need a DSLR
     
  10. The Dread Pirate Robins

    The Dread Pirate Robins TPF Noob!

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    I don't know if this helps, but what about buying a cheap, used film SLR and taking a photography class at night school or something, perhaps at a community college or community center, and see if you like it? If you were to get a K1000 or something like that and decide you REALLY liked shooting SLR cameras but then wanted to go digital it wouldn't be hard to sell the K1000 and then go get your D40 or D60 or whatever.

    The techniques for taking SLR photos don't change a whole lot between formats. If you can take a decent photo on a manual camera you can take a decent photo on nearly anything.

    I took a class at a local community college when I was just starting out with a film SLR (keep in mind that this was 1987 or so) and it served me very well.

    Adam
     
  11. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In low light and in fast action an SLR will produce pictures "far more superior," as you friends say, this is due to larger image sensors and larger lenses. However, in typical daylight you won't see hardly any improvement.

    That said, I'd suggest a used nikon d70 outfit off ebay as a first DSLR--should cost you less then $400.
     
  12. Senor Hound

    Senor Hound TPF Noob!

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    If you can afford a digital SLR, get one. The colors it produces are usually more pleasing to the viewer than a point and shoot. They offer less noise (which means better indoor shots), and also allow you to learn as much about the camera as you want. The D40 has cool settings on it like portrait, landscape, and other things, which allow you to get the advantages of the better image sensor without having to learn a bunch of stuff you feel is unnecessary to enjoy your camera.

    But I also strongly suggest looking at Sony or Pentax. For what you want, these two other companies make an AMAZING camera at a GREAT cost. And they, over the Canon and Nikon, have in-body image stabilization, which is a very cool thing. Plus, I saw the Sony A200 for the same price as the D40 at Wal-Mart. I wouldn't suggest buying your camera from any non-camera dealer, but my point is that they're equal in price, and with the Sony A200 you get an 18-70mm lens (instead of an 18-55mm), and built in image stabilization.

    I hope I haven't been too technical, and I hope whatever decision you make, you are happy. Have fun, and keep shooting!
     

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