Should I buy an hd video camcorder and DSLR, or just a DSLR with video?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by foundingfilms, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. foundingfilms

    foundingfilms TPF Noob!

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    Should I buy an hd video camcorder and DSLR, or just a DSLR with hd video?

    My friend is looking into getting into wedding photography/videography sports/events photography/videogrpahy and this will be their present.

    Can any of the DSLR cameras shoot both stills and video at the same time? Or if one chooses to shoot stills, must one stop shooting hd video?

    With hd video camcorders available for around $500, I might just buy both an hd video camcorder and a DSLR.

    Any insights on this?

    Which hd video camcorder and/or dslr would you buy?

    Isn't the hdvideo camcorder easier to use for video/have better audio controls?

    Thanks for your feedback!
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Welcome to The Photo Forums.

    Sorry, I don't know squat about video but you can check out digital SLR features and specifications at www.canonusa.com and www.nikonusa.com just to name the top 2 for still cameras. But, yes, some digital SLR cameras can do video to one degree or another. I know one of my cameras can, but only for a limited amount of time or it starts to overheat, I think they said.

    I think Sony sells a lot of camcorders so you might look there too.

    I think the above question is pretty much also your answer.

    If your friends are looking to start a business they really should have quality gear, and having compatible backup equipment is a standard business precaution for wedding/event/sports photographers/videographers, unless they enjoy spending time and money in civil court. So, you might want to make sure whatever you get is compatable with their primary equipment.

    Thank you for contributing to The Photo Forum Community and once again Welcome! :thumbup:

    While putting this reply together I called an acquaintance who does exactly what your friends are going to do. He was impressed you're in a position to spend several thousnd dollars on a gift for your friends. :thumbup:
     
  3. Wolverinepwnes

    Wolverinepwnes TPF Noob!

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    If you want to do video stuff, stick to a sony camcorder with a large builtin HD. however if you're gonna do more photography stuff then get a camera with high burst shooting like D300s, or canon 7D. the video future on the DSLRs are more for a short and small taping session nothing serious!
     
  4. cfusionpm

    cfusionpm TPF Noob!

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    While I have no personal experience with the movie modes, from what I read, the 7D and 5DII both have excellent movie capturing capabilities. I've done a fair share of video work myself, and without investing loads of cash into a high end camera like an XH or XL, its hard to be satisfied with video quality and recording capabilities. No little handicam is going to have the versatility of an entire line of SLR lenses. I want a video-capable Canon SLR for no other reason than to be able to shoot through my zoom and specialty lenses.

    Plus, in terms of recording, if you have a lot of CF cards, space shouldnt be too much an issue. The recording cap is I believe 30 min each, but I honestly can't remember the last time I've had a single shot last that long. Most shots for narrative or even documentary don't last more than a few minutes at absolute most.

    But if you need hours and hours of footage and no need for specialty lenses, a $300-500 high def HDD cam might be better for your needs. I just personally can't overlook the image quality and lens versatility of shooting video with a DSLR.
     
  5. foundingfilms

    foundingfilms TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone! Somebody pointed me to this for a solution.

    [​IMG]

    What's y'alls take on this?
     
  6. CWN

    CWN TPF Noob!

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    I honestly don't feel one person can do the work of both (professionally).

    Pick one to specialize in, let someone else do the other!
     
  7. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    The cameras or the model? :lmao:


    Canon EOS 7D impressions for filmmaker wannabes -- Engadget

    Several filmmakers have now used dSLR's (e.g. Canon 7D, 5DMkII) to make professional films.
     
  8. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    To be fair, the 5D's and 7D's aren't taken right out of the box and used to make professional films. They are equipped for the task and often look something like this:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    For a regular user, they are somewhat limited with what they come with in the box. Focusing is a ***** and the internal mic is a joke.
     
  9. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Actually, there are sites where I've seen them used with only the addition of an audio recorder in the hot-shoe, a gunstock'ish support, and a focus device over the LCD (for example, Zacuto -- see link below).

    HD Camera Rental, DSLR Camera Accessories
     
  10. foundingfilms

    foundingfilms TPF Noob!

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    yes--it costs quite a lot by the time all is said and done... and it seems inexpesnive to attach two dedicated cameras, though i could find no price on the site:

    The Dual 45 Dueler(TM): Best DSLR Camera With HD Video
     
  11. foundingfilms

    foundingfilms TPF Noob!

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    thanks for all that!
    what's your guys' take on this:
    here's an interesting thread on the dual stills/video camera system form those who oft photograph models:
    ModelMayhem.com - started shooting stills & video simultaneously...
    some pros:
    "I will have to try this I'm curious of the actual turnout. the perspective of the video might be useful."
    "Wow I know I'm about to really get flamed but...
    I think it's a great ideal!!
    (Hear me out before anyone douses me with gas)
    My main function is as a photographer. That means my MAIN concern is still images. However, I'm looking for every single value-added step that I can take to gain extra profit with low/no extra effort. If I can add a rig like this to my shoots , I can run video as a secondary option. The video camera isn't important at that point as the stills are what my client's ORIGINALLY came to me for.
    After the shoot, I'll keep my normal workflow for the images. I 'll slice up the video into individual clips, eliminating the 90% of it that shows my feet as I talk to the model, is shaky, etc. I'll take the best of those clips, use something automated like ANIMOTO to make it look "shiny and purty", and offer that up as an extra service to the client. Every client loves it when I show it big-screen because it makes them look like a "SupaStar" when they put it on FB, MySpace, etc.
    It cost me nothing but the annual subscription (which I can easily recoup in two or three shoots) and after that, I can even use it to promote the studio and my services as much as I like, for free.
    We, as photographers, have to see the extra value that we can provide the clients these days. Anyone can take a good picture with today's technology. You have to separate yourself from the crowd by what you can offer...
    Okay. I'm getting in my Speedos now, preparing for my gasoline bath...
    EDIT: It's not a good system if you want a linear video of any good length but it's excellent for grabbing clips that can be used elsewhere..."

    "The more I look at this idea the more I like it. And the dual camera rig is very interesting, also.
    But how does the union feel about this? You are putting a cameraman out of work.
    Have you considered wearing one of the cameras on your head like a hat? How might that work?"
    "I'm going to write a blog message about this convergence. I see a lot of resistance to the idea on this thread and I admit I have been too. But I just shot my first few videos myself and I have to say, it is absolutely compelling. Mixing video/audio/stills together is a bad ass media package for just about any event, depending on the intent of the end product.
    I see the convergence in technology forcing a convergence in the practitioners of both fields, video and stills. And I think we will see that convergence and I am formally here and now coining the phrase, the emergence of the "event artist".
    The event artist captures the event, artistically. Neither a pure artist nor a pure photojournalist, but a mix of both, capturing the event artistically, but with a more compelling spin using the available technological media they have at their disposal. Some day it will be immersive, or 3D or some other as yet undeveloped form. And we will be forced to adapt, or be relegated to the remnant heap of increasingly marginalized old-school players.
    Its reality, its technology, its progress, and it cannot be avoided."
    --http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=531686&page=2
     
  12. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Doing quality HD video with a DSLR is by far much cheaper than as if purchasing a HD video cam; that's what I'm finding out anyways. Sure there's cons, but some of the pros completely out weigh them, especially for the price.

    I'm working on a basic video rig for my 5D MKII. I already have a good bit of audio equipment from doing music production and recording.

    I'll have my basic rig together after February and I'll have spent about $1000 in addition to the cost of the camera, lens, and additional microphones that I already own. All together, I have probably about $7000-$8000 in photography equipment that will let me have a decent HD recording solution. Try finding and HD video camera with destachable lenses that will allow the control and quality that a DSLR setup will for that price.
     

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