should I or shouldnt I?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by stephiwoo, May 9, 2005.

  1. stephiwoo

    stephiwoo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello everyone, Im new to this place so I hope Im posting this in the right place.Ive recently been asked to do some senior pictures for a friends son, who also has a few friends that want me to do theirs. Unfortunatly I know im not good enough to do this. However I did do it lastyear for a couple of boys whos family were short on cash. Im very concerned that my work will be horrible and that their memory pictures would be a waste. She said shes willing to pay me whatever I want. If I do decide to do this should I charge her? and if so what should I charge?
     
  2. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    3,795
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    take a ton of shots and have her pick her favorite. then have her pay you what she thinks the picture is worth (for quality, etc.). If she has no idea how much photographers normally charge, give her an idea, but maybe a little less.

    orrrr you could not charge her. just do whatever you think is right. i didnt charge on my first senior portrait...
     
  3. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2003
    Messages:
    942
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm in about the same boat you are as far as confidence and what not. From my experience from working for friends, most often if you just don't mention a price, they'll normally pay you something anyway. (Of course you must also be prepared to not get paid at all)
     
  4. stephiwoo

    stephiwoo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Would you or anyone esle have any advice for me if I decide to do this? I have a Canon Rebel G, what kind of film should I use? I dont have any equipment other than the cam, so you can see how talented Im not ;)
    Thanks again
     
  5. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2003
    Messages:
    5,600
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Hermosa Beach, CA U.S.A
    Cost of film and development plus 15% plus whatever your time is worth. I have thrown those rules out the door more than once, so it is really up to you. If you are going to charge; work out the price ahead of time.

    The photographers confidence will always be key, because more often than not the client is nervous. I still battle the "I hate having my picture taken" clients. The question is up to you and you alone.

    I would go for it. The experience will be invaluable. Plus you have to start somewhere. Sooner is better than later. Outdoor locales are easier than indoors. Schedule the shots during some nice light in the mornings or late evenings. Find out the subjects hobbies. They will be much more comfortable sitting on a motorcycle or petting a horse or whatever. Pay super close attention to shadows on the face. Shadows under the eyes and or nose can bring trouble. Try and exude confidence and do not fall for the standard "this is my cheesy scared smile". Tell the subject "that looks good" or that "looks cheesy". A tripod may come in handy. Maybe a piece of foamcore to open those nasty shadows. Above of all shoot lots of film. 200-400 print film produces great results.

    The client asked you for a reason. Be brave and let us know how they turned out.
     
  6. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    It's a fair camera which should do the job nicely, so there's no real reason you'll have too much problem. Just manage their expectations and don't charge more than costs and expenses unless they like the pictures. I'm English, so I assume a senior picture is a secondary school portrait or a graduation thing?

    If you're new, use 400 ISO negative film by Kodak or Fuji to maximise the amount of light you get and avoid camera shake which makes things bad. I find that Fuji works for me - you probably won't go wrong with their standard green box 400.

    Try and avoid using the flash (red-eye may happen with an onboard flash and ruin things).

    Tripods are great, especially if you're nervous. See if you can borrow one or get a really cheap one as they're pretty much all the same for this kind of thing. Failing that, keep relaxed when you're holding the camera and try not to shake or bang the shutter button down. Improvement of your shooting technique will dramatically sharpen the pictures.

    Always take two of a picture in case they blinked in one!

    Gain a bit of height and angle on your subject, it's both flattering and avoids nasty "caught in headlights" or "mugshot" crappiness.

    Look at the background - avoid clutter if possible.

    Daylight is your friend, avoid unnatural light if you can - don't turn on the indoor lights if you can use a window.

    Practice on someone else first if you can.

    Take your time, relax, don't get stressed. Think smooth.

    Good luck!!

    Rob
     

Share This Page