Shutter Speed Rules

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Glimmerman, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    What are the general guidlines for shutterspeed when the camera is handheld?
     
  2. dsp921

    dsp921 TPF Noob!

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    With regard to camera shake, keep the shutter speed at least 1/focal length.
    If you are shooting say a 300mm lens you want a shutter speed of at least 1/300th of a second. Some can hand hold slower and some will need a faster shutter to get sharp results. Is that was you are after?
     
  3. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    Yep, thanks!

    Now to add complication to it, what about with a monopod, any general rules for that?
     
  4. niccig

    niccig TPF Noob!

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    With a monopod you eliminate up & down movement, but not side to side, so I'd personally stick with the rules for handholding, though a monopod should help. As dsp said, it really just depends on the person - I suck at handholding, so I always use a tripod if possible.
     
  5. dsp921

    dsp921 TPF Noob!

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    I'd agree with niccig, a monopod will help, but it will vary from person to person, quality of monopod, etc. Best to experiment a little, it should buy you a little, but I can't say how much.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Also, I have seen many people recommend that this rule should take into account the crop factor of many digital SLR cameras. For example, the crop factor on a Canon 20D/Rebel is 1.6...so following that...at 300mm you will want a shutter speed at least 1/480 (1/500).

    I'm not sure I agree with the logic about using the crop factor...but a faster shutter speed will always be better for sharper hand held shots.
     
  7. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    Darn, I was hoping a monopod would help more than that.

    Are there some really lightweight tripods you can recommend? Ones that are also easy/quick to setup and adjust?

    I want to be able to take photographs at 300mm while hiking. I was going to get a monopod walking stick, but if it doesn't help much then maybe not? Maybe I have to suck it up and carry a lightweight tripod?
     
  8. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    Big Mike, and recommendations where to look for used gear in Alberta?
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A monopod will probably help a lot compared to shooting hand held...but good shooting techniques will help as well. A good posture, keeping your elbow tucked in...leaning on something etc...will all help.

    There are plenty of light tripods...not real sturdy (unless you spring for a carbon fibre $$$). But less sturdy is better than no tripod at all.

    McBain has some used gear spread out around their stores. Prices are a bit high. Classic Camera Exchange is on 118 ave and about 126 street. Wally has lots of stuff but his prices are often a little high.

    There is Vintage Visuals is Calgary along with Vistek Camera and The Camera Store.

    I've found that the used camera market around here is not on par with the prices you can find on E-bay. Also, every year there is a photo-fair...it's kind of like a swap meet...held at the Ramada on Kingsway. The trouble with all these used stores and swap meets...is that most of the stuff is just too old and not that useful for newer cameras....especially newer Canon, which I have.
     
  10. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    I think I will try a monopod the next trip I do that I will be hiking. In the meantime I should probably pick up a tripod. Any recommendations, new or used?

    For lenses, I have checked out all those used and new stores, I have found the prices to be high enough that I would rather just purchase something brand new, for the most part.

    The exception is some REALLY old stuff because Nikon mount goes back further than the Canon.

    I will have to take another trip to Classic to see if they have any reasonable macro lenses, or primes.
     
  11. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Getting the right tripod depends on a few things.

    For example, I have two big tripods. One is a cheaper one with thin aluminium legs and a built-in plastic head. It's kind of flimsy but it gets the job done...and has for several years. It's light and easy to take hiking.

    I also have a set of Manfrotto Professional legs, which are heavy but very solid. I have a heavy metal ball head for this one. I like using this one more than the cheaper one...but it gets heavy.

    At first, I suggest getting a cheap or mid level tripod that isn't too heavy. If it's too heavy, you will leave it behind and then it's no use at all. If you find that it's too flimsy for you...then you can think about a better one.
     
  12. Glimmerman

    Glimmerman TPF Noob!

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    Sounds good, thanks Mike.
     

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