Sky colours?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Hair Bear, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Hair Bear

    Hair Bear TPF Noob!

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    How does the sky change colour so much in my shots

    Is it speed or apature? and what one gives the best results?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Can you show us some examples?

    Shutter speed or aperture won't affect how the sky looks...on their own. But if you change the exposure (combination of aperture, shutter speed and ISO) then that will definitely change how the sky looks.
     
  3. Cuervo79

    Cuervo79 Guest

    also if you've got a digital the automatic white balance may change the colors.
     
  4. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The sky does change with the angle you look at it. Even on a clear day with a cloudless sky, it will always look whiter and milkier the further down towards the horizon you look/point your camera, and always the bluest, the higher up you look/point your camera. And to me it always seems as if the camera sees the whiter bits even clearer than my eyes do, since my brain seems to add some blue to it from my memory...

    Other than that you can take influence on the sky colour yourself by exposure. Ever since I have lost my polarizer somewhere where it was impossible to find it again (maybe some future archaeologists will, but I didn't :cry: ), I have tried to enhance the blue by deliberately underexposing ... if I, however, expose only a 0.3 stop differently, the sky will look different. So yes, both speed and aperture may give you different results in so far as they can both lead to "normal exposure" (which I take as overexposure in my camera's default settings, mind), or over and underexposure.

    The white balance your camera is set to may have an influence in the way your sky looks, of course, though as long as it is set to "automatic", the camera should choose "daylight" for its white balance all by itself.

    Show us some examples, will you? Those might make answering your question a lot easier.
     
  5. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    "LaFoto" is exactly right, even shooting the same shot from the same position at the same time at the same exposure on different days will give you a different colour sky. There are so many factors that come into it.

    **We spell color COLOUR over here.
     
  6. Hair Bear

    Hair Bear TPF Noob!

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    I'm sorry I forgot about this post, I'll get two examples up ASAP
     
  7. Hair Bear

    Hair Bear TPF Noob!

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    Shot within mins of each other, multi spot metering on Nikon F-601 shooting to neg film 200iso Kodak

    Can't remember if I was controlling apature at this point

    1
    [​IMG]

    Turned approx 90deg and shot
    2
    [​IMG]
     
  8. xfloggingkylex

    xfloggingkylex TPF Noob!

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    the two examples above have to do with metering. The lighter picture is metered for a darker exposure, whereas the top picture the metering seems to have been affected by the sun glare on the sign. At least thats how it looks.
     
  9. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Also note that the sky normally changes color throughout the day. It is warm (reddish) in the morning, cools as the sun gets higher in the sky and then warms again (reddish) in late afternoon through dusk.

    We can make adjustments to the color temperature of the sky by using warming or cooling filters. If you want high noon sky color in the late afternoon you would use a bluish filter to compensate. If you want late afternoon sky color at high noon, a reddish or pinkish filter would do the trick.
     

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