Slides

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by b00bE, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. b00bE

    b00bE TPF Noob!

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    I was just wondering if anyone still uses slides or any other information on them. Thanks!
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I love shooting slide film. Fuji has been a long favorite - beautiful, rich colors.

    What are you specifically wanting to know?
     
  3. Patrice

    Patrice No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use diapositive film in my MF, don't get them mounted and then scan the good ones. I want to start using b/w film anf process myself. Basically just an interesting thing to do since most of my photos are captured digital now.
     
  4. Orrin

    Orrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes, I still use Fuji Provia, and exhibit the good ones at the
    Reno Photo Club where an active groups of us compete
    with slides.
     
  5. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    Yes - there's still plenty of life left in slide film :D

    Fuji Velvia is what I tend to use most, both 35mm and medium format...
     
  6. kevin_c

    kevin_c TPF Noob!

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    I did a few years ago, mainly Kodak EBX 100(Extracolor), but since I started scanning them I personally prefer using colour negative film now, I find I get much better (less contrasty) scans.
    You still cannot beat a transparency projected on a decent screen though...
     
  7. Riggaberto

    Riggaberto TPF Noob!

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    I'm really into slide film right now. I'm experimenting between kodak elite chrome and fujichrome sensia (because I cannot afford the other ones :()
     
  8. b00bE

    b00bE TPF Noob!

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    I see. I'm still a little bit confused on what a slide actually is and the pros and cons of using them. Thanks again for all the info!
     
  9. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Best way to find out: pick up a roll or three of Fuji Velvia and run it through your camera. Get it developed (tell them E6 processing). Then sit back and be dazzled with your beautiful, color-rich results.

    You'll understand it all then! :idea:

    Slide film is a positive transparency film, as opposed to B&W negative film. They are usually mounted in plastic or cardboard holders, meant to be dropped into slide film holders and projected onto a screen for viewing. But these days it's also wonderful to have them scanned and your prints made directly from them, either with an online service or at home if you have a decent inkjet printer. The colors are rich and pure.
    Slides should be stored in archival plastic sheets or boxes (personal preference) and will last for decades with no discernible loss in color, provided they aren't subjected to adverse temperatures.

    Whether or not it's your bag, only you will know after you've shot a few rolls, viewed your results, and decided how you wish to display them. Have fun! :)
     
  10. b00bE

    b00bE TPF Noob!

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    Wow thanks a lot Terri. You've really made me want to go and try slide film. My parents have a home theater with a projector for like movies and such but is there a way I could utilize a modern day movie projector like to show off slides?
     
  11. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    First of all I love slide film, and I love Fuji Velvia :)

    I do agree partially here.
    I agree that under very good conditions, they can last a very long time. However I store many slides of different film brands and types, some last long, some are rather short lived in colour, some just fall apart. So durability really does not only depend on the storage conditions, but also on the type of film, the quality of the chemical processing, and, at least from my experience, also from the climate you were shooting in. I had some really bad experience with some slides from hot and humid countries, which degraded much faster than all the rest of my film.
     
  12. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've no clue, I'm sorry! But I'm sure you could talk to the tech geeks who sell the stuff to get an idea. The slide carousels are made to hold individual slides per slot and advance/reverse one at a time, which is a pretty specific function.

    Alex: agreed, of course. :) Heat & humidity not being good for photography in general, storage situations in particular! That said, I've been amazed at the quality of slides that I've seen people pull from boxes in their GARAGES or ATTICS (ya gotta wonder). Your best chances of longevity is to start with fresh, well processed films of today and get them immediately into these archival sleeves or boxes and keep them in a cool dry place.
     

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