snow photagraphy

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by kemplefan, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. kemplefan

    kemplefan TPF Noob!

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    any tips, reflection a problem, how to protect camera
    we have over a foot of snow
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Assuming B&W film, meter carefully and be sure not to overexpose. If in doubt, bracket.

    Zip lock bags are good protection. You can manipulate the rig through the bag with just the lens peeking out.
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Brightly lit snow is about 1.5 - 2 stops brighter than 18% (medium) gray — which is what your hand-held or built in camera meter expects to see. Therefore, when metering a scene with large expanses of snow the meter (which doesn't know the difference between water, grass or snow) — simply exposes it as medium gray. Ruined shot.

    Overexpose the snow by 1.5-2 stops, but if you want to still show some texture in it, keep it to 1-1.5 stops above.
     
  4. kemplefan

    kemplefan TPF Noob!

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    ok any tips on protecting my camera it is a d50
     
  5. kemplefan

    kemplefan TPF Noob!

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    i used a plastic bag wiht a hole for the lense, and it worked greatt
     

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