Studio newbie question!

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by clee27, Aug 28, 2008.

  1. clee27

    clee27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I am looking to set up a studio in my home for the FIRST TIME EVER! I am so excited! My hubby is letting me turn the whole living room/dining room into a studio!!!!! SOOOooooooo I need advice!

    AFFORDABLE STUFF Please!!!!
    1. what lights should i get?
    2. what backdrops should i get?
    3. how should i set it up etc
    4. what other accessories do i need for a decent studio?

    ALSO, I was working for this one photographer she had 2 big head lights with umbrellas one to the left of the camera one to the right then one small one reflecting on the backdrop is that sufficient enough for a shot?

    Thanks so much! Also, if there are any photographers in the ATLANTA,GA area that have left over stuff that they are NOT USING i'll be glad take them off your hands with the right price or what not! I NEED AFFORDABLE stuff! Thanks so much everyone for reading my post! ANY ADVICE would be greatly appreciated!

    This has been just my dream! I've worked with 3 photographers with real studios and I never imagined i'd get one all to myself!!!!
     
  2. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I think the garage would be better. You probably have more light control in a garage and light bounces and reflections won't get hosed by carpet color, wall color, furniture, doors, windows, and etc.

    As for equipment I think that if you watch these videos: http://prophotolife.com/video-library/ you will have a pretty good idea of what you'll need, what you can make, and it'll give you a nice reference point to ask more specific questions. Start with Episode #1 at the bottom of the page! :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2008
  3. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maine
    I really wish people would post a budget when they post things like this.

    "2 big head lights with umbrellas one to the left of the camera one to the right then one small one reflecting on the backdrop" is certainly enough to light a portrait, but you may want more lights to make a more interesting portrait. That sounds like a pretty humdrum light setup.

    I highly suggest checking out www.strobist.com
    It's mainly geared toward hot-shoe flashes, but the principles apply to studio lights as well. If you're only going to be working in the studio, big studio lights will do you just fine. If you don't mind lugging around a bunch of equipment and spending big bucks on light gear, studio lights will do you just fine. If you're on a budget, and like to travel light, you might want to consider speedlights.

    Studio lights to consider: Alienbees if you're on a budget, Profoto if you're not.
    Speedlights to consider: Used Nikon. Particularly SB-24, SB-25, SB-26, and SB-28. All can be had under $100, the SB-26 being the most expensive.

    I don't know about backdrops, and no one can tell you how to set it up. It depends on the look you're going for. You have to experiment.

    As far as other accessories, first and foremost you're going to need a means of triggering your lights. This means either a PC cord, or some sort of wireless trigger (either radio or optical, radio being superior). If your budget is nice and big go with PocketWizards. You'll need at least 2 (1 for the camera, 1 for each light) and they'll run you about $200 each. If your budget is a little tighter, check out either the AlienBees Cybersyncs or Cactus triggers. AlienBees are something like $80 for the transmitter, $70 for each receiver. Cactus or "eBay" triggers are $30 for a Tx/Rx set, and then $20 for each additional receiver. The ABs are more reliable, with a better build quality.

    But seriously, check out Strobist.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2008
  4. clee27

    clee27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thank you so much everyone for the comments and help! I am sorry I didn't post a budget I'm really just deciding now to "make a studio" i really don't know how much one would really cost! if i were to post ummm $1000 bucks? i don't know if that would cut it .....i don't even know if i have $1000 bucks....honestly thank you for everyone's help! I will definitely check everything out!
     
  5. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Well, if you buy some tools and raw materials like hammer, staple gun, 1x2 wood strips, hardware store brackets and cheap-o plastic clamps & clips, fabrics and/or bed-sheets, some work lights and dimmer switches, an ultra cheap LARGE roll of linoleum for a backdrop, and maybe some acetate panels from the crafts shop then you could probably build "a studio" for under $1,000 and probably more like $500.

    I wouldn't buy anything though until you had a job that needed it. Build (or buy) as you go. You might find all the work you're getting is outside... or even every small scale product photography that you can do with a table-top light box made from a cardboard box and some butcher-paper.

    You can go spending 5 to 10 times the DIY price on stuff like:

    http://www.calumetphoto.com/item/CE1091/?a=CJ01&t=CJ01
    http://www.calumetphoto.com/item/CF0502K1/?a=CJ01&t=CJ01
    http://www.calumetphoto.com/item/RM7360K2/?a=CJ01&t=CJ01
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/356269-REG/Westcott_4833_Softbox_Silver_Interior_.html
    etc. etc. etc.

    But it won't be any better (in terms of resulting photo quality) and if you have nothing to shoot you may become bored with it pretty quick. Build your studio around the photos you need/want to create instead of building the studio first - if that makes sense??
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The first thing to decide is whether you want to go with flash/strobe or continuous lighting (tungsten, halogen or flourecent etc). If you are planning on shooting portraits or any moving subjects, then I'd strongly suggest that you go with flash/strobe type lights.

    Then you should decide if you want to go with 'studio' type strobes or 'hot shoe' flash type. Studio strobes are likely to be more powerful and they should be set up to use accesories...but they need to be plugged in for power. Hot shoe flash units run on batteries and they are quite small, so it would be easy to take your gear 'on location' or outdoors etc.

    If you want to go with studio strobes, have a look at something like THIS or THIS

    It might be a good idea to start slowly, with just one or two lights. Learn how to use them effectively and then add more if/when you find a need for them.
     
  7. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    7,274
    Likes Received:
    406
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV / Almost, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    2x Elinchrom D400's = $300ish ea
    Soft boxes, stands, accessories = $400ish
    Backdrop stand = about $200
    9' paper rolls = $40 ea.
     
  8. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    7,274
    Likes Received:
    406
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV / Almost, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Even though I have AB's, I personally think Elinchrom makes great consistent entry level strobes.
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I've never used Elinchrom lights but I've heard good things about them.
     
  10. clee27

    clee27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thank you everyone for your input!!!! I will take a look at all your posts in more detail!!!! You have helped soooo much! I hope I can make this happen! I'm excited!

    Most of my stuff is outdoors BUT sometimes it rains and the clients cancel on me(and some of them never call back) and that's no fun. So....with a studio I'm hoping to keep my clients with more consistency.
     
  11. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    7,274
    Likes Received:
    406
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV / Almost, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    If you do go with studio strobes, look at Alien Bee's websit at the Vagabond. It will work with the Elinchrom lights and probably most standard studio strobes. It's a battery(the Vagabond II) that will fire on AB800 (320w/s) strobe 1200 time at full power. You can hook up to three lights up to it and fire three large 400w/s studio strobes about 400 times at full power. A good investment if you want to use large lights on location.
     
  12. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

alien bees d400 price

,

how does alien bees d400 work?