Studio Photography

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by leokho, Jan 30, 2007.

  1. leokho

    leokho TPF Noob!

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    First of all I'll start by introducing myself...
    I started out with photography a few years ago, since then I have taken many pictures, but most of them are macro's, nature, architectural, etc..
    So basically I have never worked in a studio before. A friend of mine asked me to do a few shots for her boyfriend (as a one year anniversary gift).

    Now I have never done studio shots (OK, let's start by saying that I don't even have one ^^''). I know that she would want me to take some sensual (but not nude) photo. I have some ideas... But when it comes to technical questions (lighting and stuff) I don't have a clue.. I have a few hundred bucks that I can spear (for also future use), but I wouldn't know what I was doing, if anyone can help I would appreciate it.

    My idea was to create a backdrop with black tissue (to suspend it I would use PVC tubes, since I can do as much anything I want with it.. So I was thinking of creating a structure which would hold it). But how about lightning ?

    Also any further ideas are much welcome! :)

    Also, she's thinking about a print of something about A3 size, what would be the best resolution? I use a Fuji S7000, so max is 6MP (it take 12, but it's interpoled -.-').
     
  2. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I see nobody has picked up the thread to answer your questions. I think the reason is that they are pretty hard to answer as you state them. Let me start with the resolution question. Use the highest resolution the camera can produce. It is as simple as that. You can reduce the resolution later if that is what you want to do but you can't have resolution that wasn't there in the first place.

    The second question is really difficult because you didn't say what your plans are. You just discussed a single shoot and wanted advice on lighting. If you all you want to do is a single shoot then a window and reflector may be the answer. If you want to establish a studio for use into the future then how you equip it would be determined by what you plan to do with it and how often and what the layout is. Giving you advice without that information would be doing you a disservice. Hope this helps in some way.
     
  3. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hi, if you can do a white balance, consider getting some clamp lamps at your local lowes/home despot with some day-lite floods (90w are about as big as they go) [GE reveal or whatever] as they are just regular bulbs with a filter sprayed on the glass to bring up the color temp up. Bulb and clamp fixture are about $20 per light and with 4 of those you can do most anything you want as long as it's just one person -or 2 if they're close ;) . And a couple of light stands can be had for about $40 each.

    There is a description for making a seamless on this site in articles here:

    http://www.thephotoforum.com/node/20

    Find (on the net) and read " The Zeltsman Approach to Traditional Classic Portraiture

    it's free and even if you don't use the poses, you need to know them.

    Of course you have searched and read everything on portrate lighting so I'll leave you to your work.
    Have fun!
    mike
     
  4. leokho

    leokho TPF Noob!

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    Well the idea is to use it also later, that's why I would like know what would
    a good setup without giving much money =)
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    At this point...is when you may have to make some decisions and/or some commitments. You say that your budget is a few hundred bucks...but you also want to have something that you can use in the future.

    The less expensive way to start, would be with something like what Mike E is talking about...however, continuous lights are not ideal for portraiture. There have been a few lengthy discussions on this topic here (try a search)...and it's clear (to me anyway) that strobe (flash) units are much more ideal for studio portraits. However, strobe units don't come as cheaply as continuous lights. On the other hand, if you are serious about pursuing this...it may be less expensive in the long run, if you get strobes now, rather than buying something and having to replace them in the future. For the same reason, you may want to avoid the cheap 'E-bay' strobe sets...they are not very powerful...and may be quite limiting.

    Have a look at these lights; Alien Bees. They are pretty good 'entry level' studio strobe lights at pretty good prices. Most people that I have heard from, are pleased with them.
     

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