Sunrise and Sumac

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by ksmattfish, Aug 20, 2006.

  1. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    The top image is HDR made from 4 exposures.
     
  2. Arch

    Arch Damn You! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nice HDR image matt, great reflection...... good job :thumbup:
     
  3. nitefly

    nitefly TPF Noob!

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    Do you mind telling me which parts of it are at different exposures? I'm new to the technique of HDR and haven't tried it properly yet (only in my garden)..

    Stunning shots :)
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    You got me. :) I'm only playing around with it too. I normally go for 3 shots at -2, N, and +2, open them in CS2 as 16 bit TIFs (unmodified from RAW), and hit 'automate' -> "merge to HDR". Then after it does it's thing, I switch the mode to 16 bit, which opens up the 32 bit HDR file conversion box. I choose the last of the 4 conversion choices, adaptive something or other, and I tweak the curve until I like it.

    With this shot I took 4 exposures at -3, -2, N, and +2. In the original exposures to get the sky color meant that the land and trees were pretty much black. The HDR conversion lowered the contrast immensely letting me have the texture and green in the land, and the colors in the sky.

    EDIT: I just went back and looked at the normal exposure, and where the HDR really helped me out is in the upper right corner. In the N exposure it's pretty much white. For the rest of the image the HDR effects are fairly subtle compared to the super tweaked, local contrast enhancement HDR that are very popular all over the web right now. Getting that painting-like local contrast does look cool, but my main use for HDR is to compensate for not carrying a split neutral density filter, stained glass windows in churches, etc...
     
  5. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Sumac!
    THAT is the name of this tree.
    Now I remember!
    Thanks for posting this pic (second here) and the NAME of the tree!
    Sumac - Sumac - Sumac (memorizing).
     
  6. Tolyk

    Tolyk TPF Noob!

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    What does HDR stand for? I like the picture, but don't understand the technique you're discussing..

    As for the Sumac.. I just took pictures of some of that a few days ago as well :) Fun stuff, sumac
     
  7. Antarctican

    Antarctican TPF Noob!

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    Oh my, that HDR shot is just breathtaking. Well done!!!
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    High Dynamic Range. You take 3 or more exposures of the same scene, one for the shadows, one for the highlights, and one in the middle, and use software to combine them into a 32 bit HDR file. Digital cameras have a dynamic range of 5 to 6 stops, and with this technique you can double that.
     
  9. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    Wow, the first shot is just stunning! Thank you for the explanation as well!
     
  10. Tolyk

    Tolyk TPF Noob!

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    Ahh, okay, thank you.

    I use a 35mm SLR, is it still possible to do this technique with a scanner then?
     
  11. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    whoa! the first oneis awesome!
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Yes, as long as you have at least 3 different exposures of the same scene.

    .
     

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