Supplying original files on CD

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by milkyman90, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. milkyman90

    milkyman90 TPF Noob!

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    Hi all, yet another newbie asking for advice on "what to charge", although I'll try and be as specific as I can with this one and use my own brain where possible...

    I shot a local music festival last week. One of the bands was made up of six guys from a nearby school. Backstage were their parents, some of whom asked how and where they can see and buy the photos I was taking. I gave them my card.

    One parent has since been in touch. I directed him to a watermarked gallery of the shots and also provided a Photobox link where he could order prints for around £7 each (if you live across the pond then don't let my currency put you off ;)).

    Today I received an email from the same parent saying "Superb photos! What would be the cost of a high quality disk of all the images? This would be for personal use only."

    Now in all likelihood if the guy had all the originals he would share them with the other parents of the band members whether he was 'allowed' to or not, so with that in mind I have to give him a quote...

    There are 70 images in the set.

    My initial thoughts were to charge "a fair whack" for the whole lot, but to also offer a disc with photos of only his son for significantly less, as that way sharing the images will not be an issue.

    Out of my head I plucked the figure of £70 for all the photos (£1 an image!), £20 for his son only and £25 if I included the group shots of the band. Sound fair to you? Too high? Too low? Please give your opinion :blushing:

    I've no idea what a seasoned pro would charge in this situation. Of course I have the voice in my ear saying "don't price yourself out of a sale!" But I'm also all to aware of the importance of not underselling oneself as a photographer. And the photos are good!

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance guys and gals [​IMG]
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure what a "high quality disc" would be, but for 70 images on a DVD that could be printed desk-top size (8x10 max) for personal use only I would charge $750.00 USD.

    The client would get Use License with those terms. There would be an image of the Use License on the disc also.
     
  3. milkyman90

    milkyman90 TPF Noob!

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    Well if I asked for the equivalent of $750 then I think it would guarantee no sale at all :meh: But I understand that on a per-image basis that's a sensible figure. Hmmm...

    And by "high quality disc" I mean full size JPGs (15Mpx).
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    So, the band, or anyone else, could print posters or billboards at that size.

    Once you let those images go at that size they don't need you anymore.

    I charge $30 USD for a 5x7 inch print. 70 of those is $2100 USD. They would be getting a smoking deal at $750 for the 70 images.

    So somewhere between 70 GBP and 450 GBP would work, you figure.
     
  5. raider

    raider TPF Noob!

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    see that's what I've been looking for KmH - prices that others charge for a specific item. I've had clients balk at $25 for an 8x10... I know it's regional and based on many other factors, but for the customer who only takes numbers for consideration, face value is perfect.

    thanks!
     
  6. musicaleCA

    musicaleCA TPF Noob!

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  7. HeY iTs ScOTtY

    HeY iTs ScOTtY TPF Noob!

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    its a scary thing when your just starting to become popular in your area and people are asking what you charge isnt it? im having this problem now. all of a sudden i have a ton of people asking m to take picture and sell pictures. im scared to overprice myself because im just starting and trying to get a good client base and portfolio but i dont want to ask to much and have people shy away.
     
  8. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    It's much easier to lower prices than to raise them.

    If you are going to go into business, success will only come if you know how to do business. Business's run on paperwork.

    It has much less to do with how good a photographer you are.
     
  9. CygnusStudios

    CygnusStudios TPF Noob!

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    100% correct. There will always be people who balk at prices, and some who will not. You cannot build a profitable business with those who balk at prices. You quote your price and deal with those who choose to do business with you.

    Despite the many who believe that capturing an image is simply pointing a camera and snapping the shutter, there is far more to it, and that knowledge is valuable. If they could capture the image, they would. The simple fact that they have come to you proves that they are not able, or were not able at that time. It is not your fault, and it is not your responsibility to give away your work.

    If you wish to succeed in business, you must learn business skills. You have to know that your products and services have a value. The key is determining that value and educating your clients to that value.

    Think about it like this. Most people would love to own a Ferrari, yet not everyone can afford it. They do not lower their price based on this fact. They make their living based on those who can appreciate and afford it. Your product is no different. If someone cannot afford it, move on to those who can.
     
  10. Reese's PB Luver

    Reese's PB Luver TPF Noob!

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    Remember what you are selling. You are not selling a disc or even a disc with files on it; you are selling art you created and spent your valuable time creating, sorting through, and post-processing/editing.

    Would a painter/illustrator/artist sell a picture they created for $1? No, not even a print of one! And when they sell those, they don't sell any reproduction rights with them, which is something you will be selling, so now not only are you selling your artwork, but you are also losing future print sales (because ppl will go print at Cheapo Depot instead of use you - and they'll likely also post the photos on the Internet/e-mail them to ppl/give prints to family members and friends/etc.).

    So, yes, $1/image in any currency is far too small! I doubt you'd be able to pay off your bills with that amount, much less give yourself pay.

    Only you know what your images and time is worth, but be fair to yourself! If they cannot afford all 70 photos, you could do what you suggested and give them a CD of fewer photos, i.e. just their son or a selection of the best of the photos. Alternatively, you can offer digital files individually or in a pack of so many (i.e. 5 files, 10 files, 15 files, 20 files, etc. as your different offerings). It is your choice what you want to offer them, but stick to your guns on pricing so that you can cover your overhead costs (including time spent), cover some loss in print sales, make a profit for the business, and pay yourself (amoung other things).
     
  11. raider

    raider TPF Noob!

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    small towns - I tell ya - we're not over or underpriced though...
     

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