Surreal Landscapes

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Innocence, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Innocence

    Innocence TPF Noob!

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    1/ http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=5013667

    Wow what the?? I looked up his gradual grey filter and it greys out bits of the lens area? Haha i totally don't get how he did the photo and if someone would be kind enough to explain how these things are done, that would be fantastic!

    2/ http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=5016595
    Again, how on earth! It almost looks like CG!!

    3/ http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=5012815
    This one at least it's deemed "manipulated" haha, but gosh again!! What the!!

    Thanks!
    I hope it's ok to link, because don't think I'm allowed to direct link.
     
  2. celery

    celery TPF Noob!

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    Nice shots. I'm jealous, the only bodies of water I get to see are in the bathroom.
     
  3. Remi M.

    Remi M. TPF Noob!

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    Photos 1 and 3 were done with a neutral density filter and or graduated neutral density filter. The filters basicly work like sunglasses for the lens. Very simply, it cuts down on the amount of light entering the lens. What that lets you do is have the shutter open longer than you would be able to otherwise. It's great for shooting any moving water. As it smoothes it out.
    A graduated ND filter blocks light more in some part of the image than other. Usualy blocks more of the top half and less of the bottom half. Because the sky is usualy brighter than the foreground.

    Shot 2 was done using a technique called HDR. It's a composite of mutliple shots taken at different exposures to create one image with allot of light depth.
     
  4. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, you did it right.
    Thank you for your observation and circumspection.
     
  5. Innocence

    Innocence TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Remi M!

    I found a nice website which may be helpful to other people who are as lost as me! A bit about GND filter and mostly about HDR.

    Do a lot of (majority) of landscape shooters use these filters?
     
  6. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This photographer has a good understanding of technique. Either of these photos would be drab and uninteresting if shot on a sunny day at high noon. The photographer has made the sky become the subject by manipulating the images well.
     
  7. aaronphoto nz

    aaronphoto nz TPF Noob!

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    A tip on fast effective metering for sunset shots. As the light changes quickly, point your spot meter or center weighted meter at the darkest blue in the sky, if available. Use a telephoto /zoom if you don't have a spot. Take an apature priority reading and apply the long corresponding shutter speed to that combined with an ND or grad. Recompose your camera and take the shot. It is ideal to have a cable release with timer, or just use your self timer on the camera. As the sun drops to the horizon keep following the darkest blue patch. This will give you a constant neutral gray balance. Use a high f-stop like f22 if you have it on your camera. This will give you a longer exposure along with the ND/Grades. There is a lot more to it than that but it will get you started. Hey presto a balanced sunset or after-light exposure. With a bit of practice and patience you will be a pro in no time. Oops a lot of photographers won't like trade secrets blurted all over the net....they will get over it.. have fun. if you have any questions you can email me direct. Here are some examples of graduates been used in landscape shots. Check the environments section. http://www.aaronphoto.co.nz
     
  8. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    Yes, I would say the majority of landscape photographers use either ND grad filters, or some kind of HDR / digital composite for a lot (but by no means all...) of their shots. Unless you have a particularly overcast day, or are excluding the sky from your compositions, then the contrast between bright sky and darker foreground is usually too great to record a proper exposure in both.
     
  9. Innocence

    Innocence TPF Noob!

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    thank you aaron for the tip, and j mcquillen for the explanation! =]
     

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