T-Max film vs Tri-X films

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by photoman, Dec 24, 2003.

  1. photoman
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    photoman New Member

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    I have recently used up my 100' roll of T-max 400. I would like to know your opinion if i should buy another roll of T-max or try some Tri X 400.

    Is there a difference in grain quality?
    (Ive done some work with both but havent noticed a great deal in difference)

    Ive done developing of both and it seems that the Tri X has a very pronounced red stain that i couldnt get rid of, but i can get rid of the stain on the T-max.

    Any suggestions would be helpful

    BTW I would like to know if there is also difference between T-Max 100 and Plus X iso 125 (your opinion)

    (I would prefer to stay with Kodak film)
    (All film metioned is 35mm)

    (P.S. Most of my work is blown up to 8x10's)
  2. TheProf
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    TheProf New Member

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    Tmax is a T grained film so the grain when developed properly will be a bit "tighter" than Tri-X Also Tmax tends to have a bit more inharent contrast, which also makes it not as forgiving as Tri-X. Tri-X is very forgiving film but the tonal range and grain structure are not as nice as a T-max fim. Tri-X tend to be a bit flat. So if you do use it I would recomend you over develope a bit.
  3. havoc
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    havoc Jedi something or other

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    I have used both and for "regular" shooting i will always trust Tmax over Tri-ax. Tmax is a superior film in my opinion, much finer grain and a better tonal scale. If i am pushing the film though i will use Tri-ax, it works well for it and is suited well for 3200 ISO push and higher. Obviously when you push film you will expect more grain so this doesn't bother me. And when pushing the contrast gets bumped up as well.
    Basically, Tmax for everything but the push.... :D
  4. photoman
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    photoman New Member

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    Is the tri-x better for the push because of the greater base fog?

    Thanks for the responses

    Has anyone done alot of pushing of T-max 400 and TX 400 to 3200?

    How were your results?

    I havent yet found a applical situaiton that would call for such a push

    Any info would be helpful
  5. havoc
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    havoc Jedi something or other

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    I am not sure which is better, but both films will work well up to 3200 ISO.

    The reasons way you might wanna push that far is for extreme low light, or darker sporting events where you want to stop motion. Those are the situations i use it for. I am sure others have pushed for other reasons as well.

    The look of the pictures after pushing will show a signifigant increase in contrast, and you will probably lose some of your weaker highlights. (due to the increased time in the developer.)
  6. TheProf
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    TheProf New Member

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    Its been my experience that TriX pushes better due to the long tonal range and that it is "forgiving" film. I have also been told that Kodak VP is excelent for pushing.
  7. photoman
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    photoman New Member

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    Ive tried the push of the Tri-X film and was pleased with the reslults. The grain was defantly apperent but much better looking than the T-Max pushed to the same speed.

    Now i know there's a lot of people saying that T-Max has a red dye in it that is hard to get out. But i've noticed that i can get almost all of the red out of the T-Max but i can't seem to get rid of the Tri-X red stain. Is there anything i could try to help with the red stain.

    I normaly use D-76 1:1, then stop, and fix with kodak rapid fixer about 4 mins, and then use hypo clear for 2:00 minutes and wash for Five minutes changing the water very frequently, and then use photoflo on the film to dry.

    Is their any hope for me or am i permently stuck with the red stain on the Tri-X.
  8. TheProf
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    TheProf New Member

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    Do you mean the Purple stain? If you pre wet it will remove the initial blue/purple layer and I would wash for longer I usually do 10 - 15 I think you will always have a slight purple cast to the film though.
  9. Walt
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    Walt New Member

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    Since going back to b&w I have been using Agfa APX. How does it compare with the Kodak films?
  10. photoman
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    photoman New Member

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    Thanks im going to try prewetting my film and see what comes out :D.

    I've only had experience with kodak film and can't compair it to Agfa APX.
    Sorry


    Thanks again
  11. havoc
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    havoc Jedi something or other

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    I've heard rumors though i have no proof to back it up that T-Max is supposed to have a slight purple tint to it, and that it helps to correct some contrast issues they are having when they developed the film.
  12. ksmattfish
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    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    The main diff between tabular grain films ("T"-max for tabular), and more traditional emulsions (hard to get more traditional than Tri-X) is the shape of the grain crystal. Most films have a round or roundish polygonal shaped grain, while T-grain films (Kodak T-max and Ilford Delta films) have a grain that's tabular, or coffin shaped. Visually this results in a grain pattern that seems finer than it really is, but in some instances this can result in a perceived loss of sharpness.

    If you are having issues with Kodak's various purple and red dyes, try Ilford films. While not exactly the same, their films are designed to compete with the Kodak varieties, and are similar:
    Kodak Tmax films compare to Ilford Delta films
    Tri-x compares to HP5+
    Pan-x compares to FP4+

    Personally I love the HP5+.
  13. fotoadam
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    fotoadam New Member

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    what he said.. i use tmax400. i use to use ilford 125 but its garbage.!

    adam
  14. ksmattfish
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    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Film choice is sort of like food choice; some folks love what other folks hate. You're going to have to make a choice and stick with it long enough to determine how the film reacts to different situations, and if it suits your shooting/development style.

    Personally, I'll shoot on almost anything to avoid using Tmax 400. I shot it for 4 years (because that's what my photog instructor suggested), and finally decided that it just doesn't work as well for me as Ilford HP5, or even Tmax 100 pushed to 400. But that's just me. Choose a film, buy a 100' bulk roll, and shoot and develop 20 rolls before you try a new film.

    And by the way, Ilford FP4 rocks! I use it (repackaged as Arista brand) for almost all my 4x5 shooting.
  15. photoman
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    photoman New Member

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    Thanks for the info ive gotten the 100' roll of Tri-X and and going to try and see what it is like. I've tried the prewetting of the film before developing and noticed a vast improvement in the purple/red stain on the tri-x and the t-max. Now there is only a slight tint to the film, so im happy with the results and can live with a little red.

    Thanks for all your advice and suggestions :D

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