Table Glass

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by MG TF 135, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. MG TF 135

    MG TF 135 TPF Noob!

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    Not really into still life, although i am having a dabble to try and get interested. Anyway, had this glass on my outside dining table. I really liked the contrast between the symetrical table slats and the curves of the glass. I wanted some reflection in the glass to add a touch of depth, but did not want the reflections to overpower the contrasts in shapes.

    How did i do??
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking.......Thanks for your comments.
     
  2. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    The glass is dirty which is distracting. If you are tyring to show contrast in forms you should make the DOF much deeper. The contrast is between the glass which has all these curves and different shapes and the table which is rigid, well defined, entirely comprising of rectangles. You loose that contrast when the DOF is so shallow that it blurs the table.

    Try a higher angle as well so that the table fills the frame.

    You might want to lay the down on its side, perdendicular to the wood on the table and shoot the scene from above.

    If you are doing a form study the colors don't matter. Just make it B&W
     
  3. MG TF 135

    MG TF 135 TPF Noob!

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    The glass had water inside which looks like dirt. I had a horrible background which is why i had a low DOF, but if i took a higher angle then i would not see the background anyway, good point.
     
  4. EBphotography

    EBphotography TPF Junkie!

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    I agree, a bigger DPF is necessary, but I think the angle would lose the curvature of the glass. Not sure what I would do, but maybe change the bg color?
     
  5. MG TF 135

    MG TF 135 TPF Noob!

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    Ok, had a reshoot last night trying to take some advice into consideration.

    Changes - i set the glass in a different position on the table making the table lead deeper into the background. Set a slightly deeper DOF to make the slats on the table more defined. Changed the lighting too, used the outdoor light which was shining from high back right. Also changed the white balance to 'cloudy' as this gave a warmer feel to the wood.

    Again please critique, your knowledge is helping me learn.......

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking, thanks for your comments.
     
  6. MG TF 135

    MG TF 135 TPF Noob!

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    bump. Thought i would get a comment after re-shooting!
     

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