Takeing photos at concerts. Need Help!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by z71chevy, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. z71chevy

    z71chevy TPF Noob!

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    I recently just went to a few concerts (Jason Aldean, Carrie Underwood and Craig Morgan if your wondering), and I could not get any good pictures. I had no idea what setting or anything to use on the camera, all the lights at the concerts made it really hard for the camera to focus. Most of my pictures came out blury or fuzzy/grainy. Please give me some pointers, im such a begginer it is not even funny.


    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    First off, what camera and gear do you have? For a concert, you are going to want a lens with a wide aperture (2.8 or wider). Also, you are going to want to crank up the iso, probably around 1000, and shoot at as slow a shutter speed as possible. It takes alot of tinkering to get it right, but when you do, they come out great.
     
  3. reznap

    reznap No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If you're going to go to more concerts like that I'd suggest a pair of ear plugs..

    Just joking. What are you using for a camera? (EDIT: a bit late on that question) Were you in automatic mode?

    Blurry images were probably due to a long shutter speed since it was dark there. The grain is most likely noise due to a high ISO. If you're using a point and shoot camera there are limitations to what it can do in low-light situations, like concerts, because of the small digital sensor they use.
     
  4. z71chevy

    z71chevy TPF Noob!

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    I actually had two cameras with me, a point and shoot Kodak (10.1 mp) that absolutely sucked unless it was zoomed out a ways. The other one was a Kodak easyshare Z712 IS (7.1 mp 12x zoom). It did ok, but still only 1 out of every 6 came out ok. I think the best mode I found was "backlight".
     
  5. reznap

    reznap No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1 out of 6 came out ok.. I'd be happy with those results, I delete 90% of what I take.

    You're going to be a little limited with those cameras. The Easyshare IS isn't bad though, and with a better understanding of exposure and how it relates to lens aperture and shutter times (as well as ISO) will help you use it to its potential.

    As for zooming in and out... when you zoom in close you're going to have more of an issue with the camera itself moving (hands shaking, etc..), causing blur. Even with the fancy stabilization this is still a big issue. Also, many zoom lenses and point and shoot cameras narrow the aperture as they zoom in, further lengthening shutter speeds and compounding the problem. In these cases you're forced to either trade between a grainy image or a blurry image. Most people I think would say that grain is preferable to blur.
     
  6. z71chevy

    z71chevy TPF Noob!

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    @ reznap, I do not have any understanding of exposure and how it relates to lens aperture and shutter times and ISO. I am only a jonior in high school. I know absolutely nothing about photography. I just mess around with the different camera modes until the picture comes out good. I am maybe considering going to collage for photography though...
     
  7. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Aperture is the size of the opening inside the lens that decides how much light is let in. An aperture of 2.8 lets in alot of light and has a WIDE opening, while an aperture of 22 lets in a SMALL amount of light, and has a really small opening.

    Shutter speed is obvious. Faster shutter speeds are used to "stop" motion.

    ISO is the camera's sensitivity to light. For example, an image taken at iso 100 is barely sensitive to light, and is often used in BRIGHT situations. An iso of 1600 is very sensitive to light, and is used when there is very LITTLE light.

    So, ideally, you would want an aperture of 2.8 or wider, an iso of prob 1000, and a shutter speed of 1/125 or faster.

    Now, i am not sure what these p&s's can do. If it is possible to use a manual mode, i would try that. For me, using manual is a whole lot of guess and check. "set it this way.. hmm. thats too bright." so then i speed up accordingly, whether it be aperture or reduce the iso sensitivity.

    I hope that wasnt confusing. haha
     
  8. mrpink

    mrpink No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There have been countless numbers of posts lately on this very subject, and some very good explanations by some very talented photographers have been offered. Even though you are only a "jonior" in high school you can still read (as for spelling... that jury is still out). I suggest you read up as much as you can before you enter "collage" with a study in photography.






    p!nK
     
  9. z71chevy

    z71chevy TPF Noob!

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    @ mrpink

    Haha, ya im a math guy, not spelling or grammer. But thanks for the heads up about the other posts on the subject. Is there a certain term for it?
     
  10. TheSolicitor

    TheSolicitor TPF Noob!

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    Go to the top of this page. Click the site logo.

    When that new page loads, look at the right hand side of the page. There's a Google based search bar, there. Do a search for concert, concerts, music, bands, anything that strikes your fancy. You'll get your answers.

    I'd also suggest Mozilla Firefox as a browser as it contains a spell-check mode and will keep you from having silly spelling mistakes, because as you admit, spelling and grammar aren't your thing.
     
  11. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    A complete "math guy" nails the spelling and grammer since it's so darn simple. ;)
     

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