Taking photos at night

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by clarie, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. clarie
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    clarie New Member

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    I'm hoping if the weather is good to take photos tomorrow night of a old historical building, they have flood lights shinning on the building at night. What do you recomend? settings? tripod? flashes?
    Clara
  2. Bo4key
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    Bo4key Active Member

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    Tripod is a must. Depending how far away you will be, a flash won't do you much good due to light fall off. Also, use a remote shutter release or your camera's built in 2 sec timer to avoid shake when depressing the shutter while it is mounted on the tripod. Oh, and turn off IS on your lens while it is tripod mounted.
  3. clarie
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    clarie New Member

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    I thought that would be what i needed. i have the tripod, and remote. on the IS you talking about the viberation reduction?
  4. Bo4key
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    Bo4key Active Member

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    Yes, turn off image stabilization when tripod mounted
  5. Compaq
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    Compaq Well-Known Member

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    That article was actually very good, I think, despite high spam factor.
  6. clarie
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    clarie New Member

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    thanks for the link Sara, lot of good info :)
  7. cgipson1
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    cgipson1 New Member

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    No.. lots of good SPAM!
  8. greenx
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    greenx Member

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    Any reason why to turn off IS while on tripod?? Never heard of it...
  9. snowbear
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    snowbear Well-Known Member

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    IS / VR works by making small movements to counter the vibration. If the lens is on a tripod, this can actually cause vibration. Check the manual that came with your lens (or camera) - I believe some of the newer models have a "tripod" or "passive" setting.
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  10. Dikkie
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    Dikkie New Member

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    Yes, I would recommend settings :)

    I wouldn't use a flash, well, you can, but I never do.
    I use a (mini)tripod and a long shuttertime.

    Aperture : experiment. Use a very small one (eg F 16), for starlight formations in the streetlights.
    Try to find out what your sweet spot is on your lens, mostly somewhere in the middle: F 5.6.
    Or try to focus your subject and play with depth of field: F 1.4 etc...
  11. TCampbell
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    TCampbell Well-Known Member

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    If the subject is perfectly still (and since it's a building let's hope that's true... otherwise you should run for cover) AND if the camera is perfectly still (e.g. on a "solid" tripod -- and I do emphasize "solid") THEN you can leave the shutter open on your camera as long as necessary to get the shot.

    A flash wouldn't carry far enough to be effective on a subject such as a building (you'd need some incredible lighting -- so I wouldn't bother.)

    I emphasized "solid" tripod because I have a few tripods. Some are solid, but heavy (wouldn't want to have to go on a long hike and have to carry them) and some are quite light. My lightest tripod flexes quite a bit -- it's "springy". That means I have to use a remote release (or use the self-timer mode on the camera) to trigger the shutter and if it's windy, just the wind will keep the tripod from settling. Basically if you need a long exposure you want to make sure the tripod doesn't have a vibration or you'll get a blurry shot.

    Once you've got a solid mount, go ahead and experiment. While you could use a low f-stop, that'll provide a narrow depth of field. You may just want to use a middle or high f-stop because now that the camera is solid, time is no longer an issue. Keep the ISO low to prevent "noise" in the image.
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  12. Joves
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    Joves New Member

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    I agree with Tim. You can also use mirror lock to get the shot.
    On the IS/FR I do not know about Canons lenses but my older VR lenses have Mode1 as the shot is taken, or Mode2 Full Time VR, the only time is use it on a tripod is id I am running the mount loose to either pan or track a subject, and then it is in Mode1. Fact is I hate Full time VR and never use it.

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