Taking pictures with a telescope...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Corry, Jun 15, 2005.

  1. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    My boyfriend is wanting to use his rebel to take pictures of the stars and moon, and was wanting some info on using a telescope...so what can y'all tell me?

    Are there any particular telescopes that you reccomend, and do certain ones work with cameras, or do you just have to rig em?
     
  2. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    They make mounts so you can jack your camera right onto the end of the scope and shoot that way. You can also get piggy back mounts so that the camera rides on top of the scope and sees what it sees. The disadvantage to the piggy back is that your not using the scopes optics.

    Is it a film rebel or a digi rebel?
     
  3. Skipster

    Skipster TPF Noob!

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    Most any telescope can be used for astrophotography. The tighter the mount, the better the pics will turn out. A telescope that tracks celestial objects works best for long exposure shots > 30seconds. Easiest thing to start with is a t-adapter (specific for your camera lense mount) and a basic camera adapter (specific for your eyepiece diameter). You then drop an eyepiece inside the basic camera adapter and thread it into the t-adapter. Then attach the whole unit to your camera. Pics of this simple set-up to follow.

    Start with your camera.
    [​IMG]

    You then need to purchase a t-adapter or t-ring that mounts to your camera.
    [​IMG]

    You'll also need to purchase a basic camera adapter that fits your telescope. 1.25" are the most common. That is the diameter of the eyepiece.
    [​IMG]

    This is a picture of the eyepiece before inserting it into the basic camera adapter. Note the rubber eyeguard is still attached.
    [​IMG]

    This picture shows the eyeguard removed and the eyepiece inserted into the camera adapter.
    [​IMG]

    This pic shows the t-adapter mounted to the camera and the basic camera adapter (with eyepiece inside) threaded into the t-adapter.
    [​IMG]

    This is a crude picture of how it all mounts into the telescopes eyepiece holder.
    [​IMG]

    Hope I've helped in some way or another.
     
  4. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    Skipster! that's cool!!!!
     
  5. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    Is he planning on buying a telescope just for this purpose!?

    The best "value" telescope would be whats called a reflector (works kinda like a mirror lens) where the eyepeice is near the end of the scope thats pointing at the stars. Get as large a diameter mirror reflector as he can afford as these will allow more light in and more detail.

    And a good Equatorial mount preferably with a motor drive to track the stars automatically.

    I am fortunate that my mate has the telescope and I have the camera!:D
     
  6. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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  7. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    No, not JUST for this purpose...he wants it to just look at the stars, as well.
    He has both the film and digi rebel, but will almost definatly be using only the digital. Thanks for all the help, everyone...I'll show em this thread as soon as he gets back in the house...looks like some really helpful stuff here!
     
  8. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    Digital cameras are not very good for astro-photography. They don't have very low ISO's which leads to horrible noise and since they're battery operated they run out of juice super fast, especially in the cold, which is what it is when your star gazing.

    An older model, manual 35mm would serve you much better in this persuit. You need something that, if it uses a battery, only uses it for the meter, and has the ability to keep the shutter open for long periods of time. If you want to do deep sky then the time goes up into the minutes possibly 10s of minutes. If your doing the moon then a regular shutter speed will do, and the digi will probably work OK.
     
  9. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    I don't know about that. I've seen some really good work taken by Pursuer with his digital rebel in this thread. Canon even has a new camera in Japan (and soon to be in the US I believe) that is basically a 20D that's tweaked for astrophotography, called the 20Da.
     
  10. Skipster

    Skipster TPF Noob!

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  11. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    From what I've read you should get more colour in film than digital but that may have been printed over a year ago!

    It would be nice to see the results from a digital and a film aimed at the same target!
     
  12. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    It's certainly not impossible I just wouldn't recommend it. If your doing objects that don't require long exposures than a digital camera will be just as good as film. At least as good as it normally would be.

    I'm pretty sure that if you pitted a digital vs. film in long exposures you would end up with unacceptable noise in the black regions and you'd blow through batteries at an alarming rate. If you want to go digital in the astro-photography area most people use cooled CCD's that are specifically made for astro-photography.
     

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