TAKING PICTURES WITH ONE GOOD ARM

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by ZIN, Oct 24, 2007.

  1. ZIN

    ZIN TPF Noob!

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    I know this is not an easy thing to do but I have MS and really want to enjoy taking some great pictures is there a good camera choice for a person in my situation or am I completely screwed? If you have any advise on camera lenses please feel free to give them and be honest I have a canon powershot S70 and I really hope I could get a nice camera that could take great pictures. thanks
     
  2. (Ghastly) Krueger

    (Ghastly) Krueger TPF Noob!

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    I'd recommend an SLR with a tripod and a remote release. This way you can set things up using one hand and shoot without holdi the camera. Of course this would limit the type of pics you can get.

    Maybe in your case the canon xt or xti would serve better for their compact size and light weight.

    Good luck
     
  3. Flash Harry

    Flash Harry TPF Noob!

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    You can get a hand grip that screws to the tripod socket, it sort of wraps around the hand and would help to steady the shot, they are probably available for all slr's but a friend had one on an old canon eos650 so I know there's no problem getting one for the rebel ect as they are the USA version. H
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's not really an issue of the camera...if you are having trouble with one camera, a different one isn't necessarily going to be any better.

    Good technique will help you much more.

    Most cameras can be operated with one hand/arm. Using two hands is recommended for keeping the camera steady, so if you have to rely on one arm, then you might need to use techniques to help keep it steady.

    There are plenty of things you can do...for example, lean on something solid while shooting, or even hold the camera against something solid while shooting. It could be a tree, a post, a table...whatever. Better than that, would be to use a tripod or some sort of support. There are all kinds of supports for cameras and all sorts and sizes of tripods. That should really help. To get maximum sharpness, you (or anyone) shouldn't be touching the camera when it fires...just use the self timer and then let go until it fires.

    Lastly, some cameras (and some lenses for SLR type cameras) have built-in stabilization. It goes by different names, Canon calls it IS. This feature compensates for the small movements of the camera while we are hand holding the camera. It's not a miracle cure for blurry shots, but it does help. If you were going to get a new camera, look for one with IS...but remember that good technique is still better.
     
  5. castrol

    castrol TPF Noob!

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    Monopod sounds like a winning idea for you...
     
  6. ZIN

    ZIN TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for your answers I thought it could be done I really just needed to hear what people that really take pictures thought. I am not new to adversity as I will not be entering any photo contest either but taking qualty pictures is what I want so thanks for giving me your opinions. Camera choices would be great also.
    My choice was Pentax K10D, Nikon D80, or Canon xti. Would these still be ok or are they overkill in my situation?
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Those are certainly much better cameras that the one you have. However, I think they would be harder to use with one arm, but certainly not impossible.

    They are all good cameras, no problem there. One thing I will mention is that the Pentax has built-in stabilization...so any lens you use, will have that feature. With the Canon & Nikon cameras, their stabilization is built into the lens...but not every lens. You would have to pay a premium to buy lenses that have IS (or VR on Nikon). So in your situation, the Pentax would might be the best choice of the three. Unless of course, you really like the Canon or the Nikon...in which case you could just buy an IS or VR lens to go with it.

    Also, take a look at the Sony Alpha (A-100)...it also has built in stabilization.
     
  8. Jestev

    Jestev TPF Noob!

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    Built-in stabilization, if I remember from a recent PopPhoto article, doesn't give the same amount of stabilization as in-lens stabilization.

    Canon's IS lenses tended to test better with allowing more stops of stabilization in the tests.

    I would go with a Canon or Nikon. A Canon XTi would probably work the best out of the three for you because it is really small and light and the IS in Canon's lenses is really good. Of course, I'm a Nikon guy so I'd nod for the Nikon D80 and VR, too.
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I read that article and yes, in-lens stabilization does work better...but not by a large margin. I'm a Canon guy, so I like to recommend Canon...but if the OP plans of getting a few different lenses...having it built into the camera is a nice advantage.

    For the most part, Canon and Nikon seemed to be pretty even in the tests. The stand out lens was the Nikon 18-200 VR, which has the best stabilization out of everything they tested.
     
  10. ZIN

    ZIN TPF Noob!

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    :thumbup: I like the part about the pentax having the built in stabilization, but I also like your input that the canon is more compact two very good suggestions for my situation. I also appreciate that even though you may not use the camera you are recomending you are considering my situation.. How much more compact is the canon xti compared to the pentax k10d?
    I also have no problem that the two cost less than the nikon d80.;)
     
  11. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The best way to find out would be to go into a store and hold them for yourself.

    Also, take note that Nikon has the D40, which is smaller and cheaper than the D80.
     
  12. nossie

    nossie TPF Noob!

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    My first opinion is I do hope you will be entering contests and I look forward to seeing you enter.
    From the sounds of it "one good arm" you have a fairly strong dose of MS so I wouldn't rely on any image stabilisers for shooting, in the case of canon SLR lenses it usually means a heavy lens that's hard enough to steady with 2 hands let alone 1.

    My recommendation is to work with your camera slowly and find your limits. Get a tripod and take your time over every shot, and to be honest I'm expecting your disadvantage to be turned into an ally as you'll take more care over each setup being worth while. (Well at least that's what I'm hoping for.) Canon has a super little Infra Red Remote Control that's cheap for tripping the shutter on demand or else using the timer is a good idea too.

    If you want to start smaller with a point and shoot to see how you go before you outlay a lot of cash you'll have a greater range of tripods and supports to chose from. The Gorrilapod is a great little pocket support that won't work with large heavy cameras but will work great with small P+S (Point and Shoot) for tying your camera to poles, benches, branches etc. Also to this you can buy great P+S cameras like the Canon Powershot range with Optical Image Stabiliser built in for between $150-$300.

    If later you find it doesn't work out or you want to upgrade then these cameras sell at a good price on eBay.
     

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