telephoto & macro lenses

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by WalkingWithStrangers, May 4, 2010.

  1. WalkingWithStrangers

    WalkingWithStrangers TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm having difficulty choosing a telephoto & macro lens [relatively cheap for an amateur] as I am interested in both types. I have a Nikon D70.

    For the price & quality, which is the better lens? [I would really appreciate answers from people who have had experience with the lenses or more knowledge than "that's a good lens"] :)

    Nikon 70-300mm, Nikon 55-200

    Nikon 60mm, Nikon 105mm, Sigma 150mm, Sigma 180mm

    ^^ I'm looking for the ones with the best personal experience, because it's hard to get that from just looking at amazon, ebay, and other sites [although some of the reviews are helpful!]
     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    35,456
    Likes Received:
    12,796
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That's six different lenses to choose from. Two zooms, four prime macro lenses. ALL those lenses have different uses/strengths. As a pure "macro" lens, the Sigma 150mm or 180mm would be very handy, and are very good lenses. Nikon's new 105mm VR macro is rather heavy for its length, but doubles as a field/portrait telephoto, but really is best as a macro lens. Nikon makes an older 105mm D-series macro that's still available. Nikon also has two 60mm macros, the newer G-series, the older AF-D 60mm/2.8 as well.

    There are reviews of most of these lenses. Your budget and your desired uses will determine which is the best choice for you. Picking one of six lenses could be tough. The intended uses would determine which would be the best choice: a 60mm is very short for insects, but great for plants...the 55-200 is nice for walkaround, since the range from 55 to 70mm is actually useful...but it lacks the top-end reach of the 70-300. And the 70-300: which model are you interested in? There have been three recent 70-300's.
     
  3. WalkingWithStrangers

    WalkingWithStrangers TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That's why I'm having difficulty ahha because there are too many :( I was suggested these lenses by another site, but I cannot decide which is best. I'm more interested in plants than insects, but for macro I am also interested in common objects or things found outside that aren't bugs or nature related.

    Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR Zoom Nikkor Lens is the one I was speaking of [check Amazon for details!]
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    23,095
    Likes Received:
    3,763
    Location:
    UK - England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'd say discount the 60mm macro and focus on either the Nikon 105mm VR or one of the two sigma options (the choice between them is tricky, but aside from the 30mm focal range difference the two lenses are very similar in both features and performance with the 180mm being a little heavier than the 150mm).
    I say this because whilst you are not showing a specific interest in bugs it sounds like you are generally interested in the macro world - and often as not bugs can quicky invade that area ;)
    Saying that you have an interest in common objects as well I am inclined to say the 105mm would be the one I would recomend. I say this because other objects and generally static subjects can often end up being done a lot indoors in a studio setup and whilst the 150mm and 180mm macro lenses are fantastic performers they can often feel a bit too long when working within indoor environments - thus the 105mm would be a more suitable lens for allowing insect work (without too much difficulty) and also not being too long for indoors/studio work.

    Saying that remember that one bonuse of a longer focal length lens is increased background blur and that would be the feature that the sigma options are able to give you - so its something to bare in mind when choosing.


    Of the zooms I am less well versed and experienced with Nikons offerings, so I'll have to let others answer this - and then you yourself will have to choose between the zoom or the prime macro lens. I can say that no matter which of the listed macro lenses you choose you will get a good optical performer (there really is no truly bad prime macro lens on the market at present from the main lens manufacturers) and a solid lens to use.
     

Share This Page