The End of the Print Portfolio?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by benjikan, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. benjikan

    benjikan TPF Noob!

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    The End of the Print Portfolio?

    I was recently asked to share my portfolio with a magazine and asked how would they prefer to view it. To my surprise they said "just bring your laptop, that will be fine" and they added that "more and more photographers are presenting their work using this medium".

    I was pleased and disturbed at the same time. Being that the press are moving towards the internet and are losing millions in print media, I suspect that seeing the images on screen was more relevant than seeing my work in print. As a result of this changing paradigm, photographers will have to consider their output based on other conditions that were not considered even 2 years ago. Considering the price of constantly updating your book, as well as the environmental considerations, perhaps that is a good thing. I have considered printing books, as an alternative which costs about 4X -10X less than printing your portfolio yourself. Just check out the deals available on the Internet. Custom portfolio's can't compete.My leather bound portfolio and plastic sheet mounting cost around 450€ per book, not including the carrying case.

    I would like to hear your impressions regarding this subject and how you see where and how the presentation of commercial photography has changed and is going.

    Ben

    Benjamin Kanarek Blog » The End of the Print Portfolio?
     
  2. DennyCrane

    DennyCrane No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I believe a digital portfolio is inevitable, but I'm not happy about it. The vast difference in the displays between individual notebooks and monitors adds a random element that will effect people's perception of your work. I'm sure if you're happy with your own notebook and you're showing the portfolio, there's no problem... but what if you're sending it to someone who will view on his own rig? Your fate could be in the hands of a cheap Chinese LCD manufacturer.

    But, again, I believe this is where it will be going.
     

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