The Moon

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by Jon K, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Jon K

    Jon K TPF Noob!

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    Here is the moon. Enough said.

    200mm, 1/30, F11 or something... any tips? I need more focal range i know.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Jess

    Jess TPF Noob!

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    Hey, that's not bad! Your black is black, the moon has details and it's crisp. It's a nice composition, although I might crop just a bit off the left and bottom myself.

    I have not tips, as I haven't yet begun my moon experiments, but my understanding is that it's a task. I say good job :)
     
  3. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Oh cool!
    I love moon pics.
    And I envy everyone who gets one like this!
    My roll of film is still in the camera, but in the last night of full moon we had a cloudless sky and I tried to get a decent moon photo yet again. But I still don't know the results... Please keep your fingers crossed for me that ONE of the 16 attempts will be good - with as much detail as in this! Please.
     
  4. Raymond J Barlow

    Raymond J Barlow TPF Noob!

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    very cool shot Jon!
     
  5. Jon K

    Jon K TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys! My tip is to ignore your meter! I know it sounds silly, but since the moon might only make up 5% of your entire frame, even if you center-weight it, the meter will shine "<-|---2---1----0...." just ignore it. Stop your lens down to at least around an F8, though I liked F11 best on my L lens. Then, set your shutter somewhere between 1/15 - 1/150. Try to get it as fast as possible. Film users will have difficulty knowing the outcome, but us digital fanatics can plainly see on the LCD whether or not the subject is bright enough, and if not, post-processing can fix. I try to use AF because M is REALLY hard on such a small subject. Even a 200mm focal length (300mm relative on a 300D) means that the moon is STILL small in the finder. Canon AF is great, use it. Other than that, good luck guys!
     
  6. peteh

    peteh TPF Noob!

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    That looks good
     
  7. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    I know how difficult that image is to take! A very good attempt (and better than all of mine!)
     
  8. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    grrrrr i spent hours on monday night trying to get a decent moon shot and here you are with one in all it's crisp glory.... Well done! :D
    I'll follow your advice next time and use my dad's digital and fingers crossed! :)
     
  9. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    extremely sharp! I appreciate your focus here
     
  10. Kodan_Txips

    Kodan_Txips TPF Noob!

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    What you have to remember is that the moon doesn't glow, it reflects - it is in direct sunshine, unhampered by the effects of an atmosphere. I believe it is also towards the light grey end of the greyscale, lighter than the "average" that is used by a lot of meters when calculating an exposure.

    Decades ago, for people without a light meter, there was a rule of thumb for "normal" shots something like "on a sunny day, the exposure is: shutter speed = camera ASA, aperture = ???? (I forget, I think it was F16)"

    On that basis, using ISO100 film you would probably do ok at 1/250 at F16, when photographing the moon...

    Which seems stunning, far too little light. But don't forget you are almost photographing a light bulb.
     

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