The very first lens choice?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by A-Spot, Jun 8, 2009.

  1. A-Spot

    A-Spot TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hiya.

    This year, I should be getting my very first DSLR - the Nikon D40, which I hve heard should be a great entry-level camera. Question is, what glass should I get?

    The camera will mostly be used for landscape and architecture pictures, but I'd love to be able to use it for portraits too. Also, it should be pretty low priced. ;)

    Even though the D40 is out of production, there's still some left in the shops here in Denmark. There are some starter kits with lenses availible:

    Nikon D40 + 18-55mm + SD memory card = 550 $ (THEN add the cost of a tele objective to it...)
    Nikon D40 + 18-55mm + 55-200mm tele objective (AF-S = autofocus + manual focus tuning) = 790 $ (36 $ a month for a couple of years - more expensive than cash payment, but I'll get it NOW instead of in half a year.)

    Which one should I go for, if any of these?

    Cheers,

    A-Spot
     
  2. benlonghair

    benlonghair TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2009
    Messages:
    1,072
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Woodstock, CT
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I just got a D60 a couple weeks ago. My first purchase (last night, as a matter of fact) was the Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR

    My reasoning was that the 18-55 that came with the camera would more or less cover me for landscapes and portraits and I like doing some nature photos and the 300mm (450 effective due to DX sensor) would give me more than enough to get started.
     
  3. PhotoXopher

    PhotoXopher TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,475
    Likes Received:
    2
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    For portraits the 50mm f/1.8D would be nice if you don't mind manual focus (~125USD), otherwise the 35mm f/1.8G would be a really nice addition (~200USD)

    The dual lens kit you have up there is a nice way to get a good startup kit and will cover you in a lot of areas.

    Enjoy!
     
  4. Baaaark

    Baaaark TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    414
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North or South Pole... it depends
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Here's something to mess with you some more...

    If you are doing mostly close up work, it might be more worth it to get a flash...

    Just what you wanted to hear, more options, lol. But all the professional photos of stuff you see, like people, and macro, and whatnot, all use flash. And you can REALLY improve your look.

    But, its all what your style is. A flash would not be that big of a deal if you're a nature/wildlife/sports guy.
     
  5. A-Spot

    A-Spot TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm mostly doing wildlife, nature, landscape and architecture shots, so flash ain't that big a deal. Anyway, a Nikon flash can be bought (and paid over a year or so) for about 250 $.

    I like the 2x lens kit myself too .. fits me well :)
     
  6. A-Spot

    A-Spot TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    And if I choose the D60 or the Olympus E-520, what glass should I choose for the respective cams? (still, it should be something like an 18-55 for portraits and holiday pics, and a 55-200 for landscapes, architectural shots and candid / "people-on-the-street,-but-from-a-distance" shots.)
     

Share This Page