Tips on How to Practice for Band shots?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TylerF, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    hi all, im getting a d40 for xmas and am primarily planning on shoot live bands. i am looking for tips on how to prepare/practice for this. i know it will be dark with stage lighting and fast moving people.

    just looking for settings or possibly ways to practice shots like that at home. thanks
     
  2. Kylerood

    Kylerood TPF Noob!

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    Do you have siblings?
     
  3. ::trainwreck::

    ::trainwreck:: TPF Noob!

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    just go and shoot. If there a band you're specifically shooting, practice shooting other bands. I've only ever shot one band so far, and, well, let's just say they're the epitome of crazy stage presence. After shooting them, I feel like anyone else would be simple. One thing I've learned is to use a flash if you have one, it's a must to get anything sharp. it's really one of those thing you have to just go do, since you can't really simulate a crowd or stage lighting without, well, a crowd or stage lighting ;)
     
  4. SonyShooterA200

    SonyShooterA200 TPF Noob!

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    A flash would work wonderfully as long as you bounce the light and dont have a direct flash cause you want to have some effect of the stage lights. Here are a couple that I have done with no flash. Just my 500 f1.8 and 1600 or 800 iso......


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  5. o hey tyler

    o hey tyler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Took all of these with my Kit lens with ISO 800 I believe. El Ten Eleven show was last night. Incredible band to see live if you haven't heard of them.

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    Not the sharpest of photos. Also, notice they're from facebook which decimates quality. Honestly, I just got up close and acted like I belonged there. That's really all you have to do. I also used spot metering and tried to aim for a bright-ish spot on the guitar or backdrop to give me a relatively quick shutter speed while still making a decent exposure. No flash or anything was used, as my only lighting equipment right now is the sun w/ several cloud diffusers.
     
  6. TylerF

    TylerF TPF Noob!

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    i lold at ur user name.

    i do have a little brother.

    so if i set a fast shutter speed, wide aperture and dont point the flash directly at them i should be alright?im not really looking for the streaking and stuff. but sometimes i dont mind it.
     
  7. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Tip 1: If you have your heart set on Nikon, don't get anything less than a D90.

    High ISO is needed to get a fast shutter speed. The higher the ISO, the worse the noise is in the image. Certain sensors and certain cameras suck at High ISO performance. Those are cameras with CCD sensors.

    Fast apertures are needed for high shutter speed. f/2.8 and wider will most likely be needed.

    I wanted to shoot bands when I first started getting into digital photography. I had a 300D and a 50 f/1.8. The photos then don't compare to the photos now with a 5D MKII and the f/2.8 (I can use a narrower apeture because I can cleanly shoot at 6400 ISO) lenses that I have. But that's $XXX vs. $XXXX worth of gear.

    Plus the D40 won't AF with certain lenses and I think the Nikon 50 f/1.8 is one of those. AF can be pretty important when shooting an active band.
     
  8. imenevichian

    imenevichian TPF Noob!

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    hi,

    in my limited experience, you'll want a slow shutter speed to capture the ambient light and very little flash to fill the shadows on your subject... (remember that once you double the flash-subject distance, light decays 4 times, so again, just enough flash to light your subject but not enough to light the background!).

    the next picture was taken at 55mm, 1/30s, f/2.8, iso 800, and the onboard flash (which is all i have, so not bounced :S) set to ttl (-2ev compensation).

    [​IMG]

    also, if the band is really agressive and fast moving, it helps to know when the "slow" parts of the show are coming so you take your pictures then.

    hope it helps
    nacho

    ps: there's very little pp in this pic... pretty much what i got from camera.
     
  9. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    And most bands don't appreciate using flash. There's typically enough light from the stage lights to get good enough photos.
     
  10. timfrommass

    timfrommass TPF Noob!

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    For those of you taking band shots (great ones posted so far btw), are these professional concerts or just amateur bands? For those just going to a concert for a big artist, do you ever have a problem getting into venues with a DSLR? I know most places have signs for no photography, and I've never had a problem getting in and using a point and shoot. I'm new to DSLRs though and I wasn't sure if security is more responsive when they see a big zoom lens or even a built in flash pop up
     
  11. SnapLocally

    SnapLocally TPF Noob!

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    I recommend a bright prime, a camera that shoots at least iso 3200, and the use of "artistic" angles.

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  12. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If you want to do "pro" acts, find some local venues that host bigger national acts and start small. Don't expect to be able to shoot Zack Wylde, or Blink 182. Contact the band's management and PR. Go to their website and look for e-mail links or find out what record label they're on, go to the label site, and e-mail the label.

    Getting passes for Badfish (sublime cover band) was a lot easier than for a band like August Burns Red.

    A sure fire way to get photo pit passes is to get a job with a publication, it could really even be volunteer. Find a local music publication and offer to shoot for them.

    It takes persistance. That's probably the only way you'll get in with a DSLR without sneaking one in some how. Plus, there's no way I'd want to be in the middle of the floor at a Drop Kick Murphys show with $5000 worth of camera equipment.
     

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