Tractor for c&c

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by charlie_merrifi, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. charlie_merrifi

    charlie_merrifi TPF Noob!

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    Took This at the zoo yesterday

    [​IMG]
     
  2. puyjapin

    puyjapin TPF Noob!

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    its a nice tractor but it looks like there is a bit of camera shake, did u use the IS lens?
     
  3. adamwilliamking

    adamwilliamking TPF Noob!

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    My best guess is you used your 75-300 somewhere close to 300mm.. dont do this.
    These lenses suffer anywhere near their maximum focal length. Also is this a black and white conversion or just grayscale? really hard on the eyes dude. You could fix that by boosting the contrast or starting over with your jpg and than doing some curves or levels on the photo before the conversion.

    Just some constructive criticism.
     
  4. Samanax

    Samanax TPF Noob!

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    Exif says this image shot at 80mm, f/4.0, shutter speed 1/90 and ISO at 200.
    The B&W conversion actually looks pretty contrasty to me. I think it looks gray because there may have been a lot of colors that were in the same tonal range.

    I think there is a bit of camera shake making the image slightly blurry and not enough separation between the tractor and the background. To help reduce the DOF so that the tractor is in focus and the background is more blurry/out-of-focus you want to use a longer focal length and get closer to the subject. You're already using a good aperture size (f/4.0). And the tractor is already pretty far from the background. The closer you get to the subject, the tighter the DOF gets.

    To get a shallow depth of field (DOF) you want to use a large aperture opening (smaller f/numbers), fairly long focal length, get close to the subject and make sure the subject is away from any background elements.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2009

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