TRI-X 400

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Axel, Nov 16, 2004.

  1. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

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    I have just loaded my camera with a Tri-X 400 film. Is that going to be easier to shoot good pctures with than an Neopan 1600? What should I take into consideration when shooting?

    Please see my pics from a 1600 film here!

    Also, I have a UV filter on my lens, should I leave it on when shooting or is it better to take it off given the fact that it is B&W?

    Thank you

    PS. I don't develop the film myself, but have to rely on teh C.41 places around the corner... :?
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    All you need to know is here:

    www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/f9/f9.jhtml

    My two favourite films are Plus-X and Tri-X. Every b&w shot I've done for 30 years has been on one of these two.
    Tri-X grain depends a lot on the development (developer and dilution effects grain build up to some extent) but you should get a lot less grain than with 1600 film. Trixie is one of the finest grain 'fast' films in my opinion. Although I did like pushing Tri-X to 1600 sometimes. But if you really want grain push Royal-X Pan to it's limits - it's the size of golf balls.
    Grain shows itself mainly in the mid tones. Can be used to some effect.
    Getting a lab to process it (unless it's a good pro lab) tends to be a bit hit and miss. It's better if you can process it yourself.
    UV filters have no aappreciable effect on b&w (although some people may beg to differ ;-) ) so I would take it off. It's always best to shoot with as few layers of glass between subject and film as possible.
    Hope this helps
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Search for "tri-x" and "diafine", and you'll get lot's of interesting info on using this film/developer combination at ISO 1000 to 1600. I've been trying it out for the last couple of months, and it's become my prefered high speed flavor.
     
  4. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    I shoot all my film for my photography class on Tri-X 400. It's a pretty easy film to process myself, and grain is rarely a problem, so I like it. However, it's not a chromogenic film so some photolabs can't process it if they only have the equipment for C-41.

    Oh, and about the UV filter, IMHO you might as well just leave it on the camera to protect the lens. It won't affect the images you take, but it's nice to have something protecting your lens at all times. After all, it's much worse to get a bad scratch on the lens than it is to get one on a replacable $15 filter.
     
  5. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    I'd second this, there is supposedly some quality loss if you have it on, but i've never personally noticed it, and unless you're doing professional work you will probably be fine with it on. And I have dropped a lens before, when I picked it up, the UV filter was shattered and the lens was just fine.
     

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