Trying to whip it into shape

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by terri, Nov 26, 2004.

  1. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2003
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    In the mental ward of this forum
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    We had the Chromega-D pretty much dismantled for the journey home from Memphis to Atlanta, and finally got a day to spend just setting it up and cleaning it. It looks beautiful now. It just needed some TLC. :D Once bolted onto a table, it stands nearly 4 feet into the air - it's a beast!

    We've been stalking eBay for all the miscellaneous supplies and are currently waiting on lots of goodies to arrive.....the fun part. But also the maddening part. It's total hell to have a gleaming enlarger ready and waiting, and not be able to do anything with it!!!!

    Can't think of anything more fun to do with my long weekend, though, than messing around up there. :blulsh2: I'll keep you posted and hopefully soon will be able to show fruits of my labor!

    Actually - I KNEW there was a question I meant to ask, but I forgot about it during my prattle.... :p

    I have a motley assortment of safelights so far...differents sizes, etc, BUT they are ALL configured with 1A (red) filters. I'm wondering if they are going to work well with enlarging/contact papers. I'd like to avoid spending the money on OC/902 filters, and as soon as I'm set up I'm going to run tests on the red...I plan on using mainly VC papers (like Agfa and Ilford) hints on what my tests will reveal when I run these papers using the 1A filters?
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

    Nov 8, 2004
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    Where am I now?
    Red safelights were/are designed for use with orthochromatic film and papers. The normal safelights to use with b&w are amber/dark brown - but reds will work fine.
    If you are doing colour work then there are safelights that can be used but in practice they produce so little light as to be almost useless.
    The best thing to do is to test your safelights by doing a step wedge exposure to see if the safelights cause any fogging.

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