Two Heads, No Mess

Discussion in 'Just For Fun!' started by Orrin, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. Orrin

    Orrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    Sparks, Nevada
    [​IMG]

    I made this image many years ago, before there was any image editing software.
    It was done on a copy stand using Wess soft edge masks.


     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    40,878
    Likes Received:
    12,415
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Cool - just goes to prove that pictures could be made to lie before Photoshop! :lol:
     
  3. viathelens

    viathelens TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Northern California
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Photos have been "lies" since the beginning of photography. The bodies of soldiers in fields were moved. Multiple photos were pieced together. Scenes were set up to portray an event. HDR was created with the use of two different photos being used for one print. Nothing we do today is new, we just do it with different technology. In creating Photoshop technicians simply used today's technology to recreate what photographers had been doing for 100+ years.
     
  4. otherprof

    otherprof TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,672
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Story about Picasso: He had been working on a painting of a woman and one day the woman’s husband visited him and asked to see how the painting was going. Picasso showed him the canvas, and when the man didn’t look happy he asked what was wrong. The man said the painting didn’t look like his wife. Picasso asked him what she looked like, and the man took a photo of his wife out of his wallet and passed it to him, saying “That’s what she is really like!” Picasso looked at the photo and remarked, “Small, isn’t she?” I suppose he could have mentioned her being two-dimensional and black and white also . . .
     

Share This Page