Two lith prints

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by Bill LaMorris, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. Bill LaMorris

    Bill LaMorris TPF Noob!

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    Here is an example of two prints. One is developed with Ansco 81 and the other with Fotospeed. Bill
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  2. windrivermaiden

    windrivermaiden TPF Noob!

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    I really like the bridge photo.
     
  3. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Bill, I moved your lith prints to a new thread so they don't get lost in the other one. :)

    Ah, art is so subjective! Is your top image the one developed in Ansco? I happen to love your pinky-brown tones, and this image certainly has better contrast than the one below it. It's bordering on being too contrasty (though of course, that could be from the scanning process). The "lith-look" is very strong here. Nice one!

    The second image appears a bit flat to me. This is clearly an IR negative: what film did you use here? I'd love to see a mite more contrast here, though the tonal range is lovely.

    Are they both IR negs? Which was developed in the Ansco?
     
  4. Bill LaMorris

    Bill LaMorris TPF Noob!

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    Both photos are shot on Efke IR, with an off brand 720 filter, F-16 for 1 second. Developed in 1-12 Rodinal for 14 minutes.

    The top negative was overexposed by 3 stops {160} seconds and processed in Fotospeed at the recomended dilution. It took 45 minutes to develop at room temp.
    The bottom negative was also exposed for {160} seconds and processed in Ansco 81 with a 6-1 dilution for 5 minutes.
    These are my first 2 semi-sucessful attempts at lith printing.
    I am thinking about trying the top photo again with 1/2 stop more exposure, to try and bring the highlights out.
    The bottom one is a little tougher, it is flat. Would you sugest a little less exsposure on this one?
    Thanks Bill
     
  5. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'd start with at least a 10% increase in contrast on your bottom image; modify your exposure time to compensate. The top image could use a decrease in contrast, but again, I really like the colors you've obtained with this paper/developer combo.

    You'll have to play around with them both and see what's working for you. Lith is nothing if not maddening. :mrgreen: When it works it's highly addictive!
     
  6. tylerzachary412

    tylerzachary412 TPF Noob!

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    Liked the bridge also, there are no clouds above. Sky is very clear! I wonder how it could look on the wall as decoration. This black and white picture fits well in the design.
    My friend Jonathan printed his own masterwork on canvas. Here's how it looks like:
    $canvas.jpg
    The bridge photo may look much better with black/white colors.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 8, 2012

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