Using an OLD box camera?

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Garbz, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Here's one for the grey bearded folks out there :).

    I have gotten an Eho Box-180 Linse camera to work specifically this one:
    [​IMG]
    EHO-Box 180 "Linse"

    Manufactured by Altissa before they were called Altissa (before even the war). The question is now how do I use it? The camera takes 120 film, has a fixed shutter and fixed aperture. Well doesn't have an aperture at all really it has a rear meniscus lens. Everything seems to be in working condition, but I have no clue about what kind of film speed this thing expects. Now I will assume it was made for taking photos outside. Altissa wasn't exactly a high end manufacturer, trying to sell cheap box cameras to the people.

    Even if you don't know anything about this exact camera, can anyone point me to what kind of film speeds, shutter speeds, apertures or any other useful information exists about using cameras made in the 1930s? I really wouldn't mind putting a roll of film though this.
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,117
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Tottenville, Staten Island, NYC USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You can start with a roll of Plus X. Shoot in full sunlight, develop normally and then go from there. You'll probably be over-exposing a stop or two. Assume 1/50 and about f11 is a start.

    It's easy to rig a yellow or orange filter to cut the exposure if need be. Or shoot on overcast days.
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Or 3 or 4 stops. The only 120 roll I had was HP5 at ISO400 so I'll rig up a ND filter to cut that down a couple of stops.

    Thanks for the assumed starting point, you may just have saved an entire roll of film :D
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    With cameras that don't allow much exposure control I like C41 BW. Although it's rated ISO 400 it'll make decent prints from ISO 100 to 1600 with standard C41 processing.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Cheers, but unfortunately I don't have the facilities to process C41 at home, and half the fun of film for me is the developing so I will probably steer clear of that one. I should be able to pull HP5 down to 200 without too many problems, and I may save this film.

    By my reasoning, f/11 @ 1/50th is 4 stops under the sunny 16 rule for outdoor shooting. If I pull one stop in processing, and use a red filter I should end up pretty close to the right exposure. If it's all good I will probably load some Illford Delta 100 and pull that one stop next time around.
     
  6. bhop

    bhop No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,209
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If it works like my Kodak Brownie. There are three steps involved to using it once your film's loaded.

    1. Aim
    2. Press button
    3. Wind to next frame

    I shot 400 speed (HP5+) for my first roll in my brownie and only one shot came out. The exposure was horribly wrong. Next roll was 125 speed (Ilford FP4) and the shots worked.
     
  7. KD5NRH

    KD5NRH TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Stephenville TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I got quite a few full-sun shots on Tri-X 320 in New Mexico last August with an Ansco Shur-Shot Jr that's probably pretty similar in terms of exposure. I did pull them a bit, (1 stop, IIRC) and tweak things somewhat when I scanned them in, but everything was salvageable.

    Not exactly an artistic masterpiece, but enough for a proof of concept:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Judge Sharpe

    Judge Sharpe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    birmingham alabama usa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I am not familiar with this particular box camera. but usually there is a small pull tab that will interpose a smaller apeture in front of the shutter. I see a pull tab similar to one on my brownie on the side just below the shutter lever on yours. Any B_W film under about ASA 100 should work.
    Judge Sharpe
     
  9. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ahhh so that's what that tab is for. Any idea roughly how many stops smaller the new aperture is?
     
  10. Judge Sharpe

    Judge Sharpe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    birmingham alabama usa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    About half the value of the big one. Best I can do with out measuring.
    JS
     
  11. degro

    degro TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maastricht
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The tab on the side is not for aperture. It is the bulb time thingy. Best to use iso 50 film if you want to shoot on bright sunny days. Otherwise iso 100 wil do nicely.
    Shuttertime is about 1/30 of a second.
    Great stuff to shoot with. Compsition is the only thing you have control over for the rest deal with what you get.

    Greets,

    Peter

    Ps sorry for a late respons.
     
  12. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2003
    Messages:
    9,746
    Likes Received:
    42
    Location:
    Ahwatukee, AZ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The Eho Box has an aperture of f11 and it shoots 6x9 on 120 film.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

box camera

,
eho box camera
,
eho camera
,
how to take pictures with a box camera
,
how to use a box camera
,
how to use box camera
,

old box camera

,
old box cameras
,
old time box camera
,
using a box camera