Using digital to learn film settings

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by cal_gundert05, Nov 19, 2006.

  1. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    I never took the time or expense to experiment with different exposures and speeds on my 35mm SLR. I'd like to be able to use it full-manual, but don't want to go through the trouble of possibly-ruined photos. :mrgreen:

    But now that I have a digital camera full manual modes (full, aperture priority, and shutter priority), I can use that to learn how to use the manual settings on my 35mm. I can also teach my mom, who has always wanted to learn.

    You may ask, "Why not just use digital all the time?"
    Well, I really prefer my 35mm, especially for artsy shots. So now I can have 2 cameras that, together, suit the entire range of my photography needs.

    :wink:
     
  2. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    No one wants to go through the trouble of possibly ruined photos. You live and learn as the saying goes. I checked out your fototopic deal. Good eye!!!
     
  3. Skully

    Skully TPF Noob!

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    That is a great way to learn and apply your skills but just a little advise "WATCH EXPOSURE". After shooting film for over fifteen years now and then switching to digital I thought I could apply the same metering knowledge and know how that I learned and applied to film SLR's for years and carry it over to the world of digital however it wasnt even close I learned quickly that the film 35mm SLR and the digital SLR were two completly different animals They may look the same and use the same accessories but the metering of light via ambient or with a flash and depth of field is quite different. Film is now to the level of "what you see is what you get" the exposure latatude is at least two stops +/- so your photos will usually look good even if you over or underexpose the image. Digital on the other hand will overexpose highlights and underexpose shadows if not carefull. In closing, what Im trying to say is if you take a photo of a person on a sunny day standing under a shaded tree and you set the exposure to F5.6 @ 1/60 sec with a ISO speed of 400 on your digital SLR and then apply this same AV and TV to your 35mm with the same ISO the photos will not be even close due to the cameras meter light differently. Film uses a focal plane and digital uses a sensor. I just dont want to see you ruin a photo due it looked great on digital. Learn each camera and what it can do. Believe me Ive learned by trial and error going from film to digital.
     
  4. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Hmm, there seems to be no way around learning by trial-and-error.
     
  5. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Cool thing is trial by error is an excellent learning journey.
     
  6. Frequent Traveler

    Frequent Traveler TPF Noob!

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    Skully hit the nail on the head! My dSLR meters VERY differently than my film cams - even using the SAME lenses.

    However, haunt your library for books chocked with exposure tips, buy some film and go take some photos.

    Write down everything about the exposure and after developing, look at what worked and what didn't. Trial and EDUCATED error is the best way to learn (and i am still learning myself!).
     
  7. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    Good thinking if you're into film and wanting to learn. While it might be trial and error... at least with digitial the "error" part of the process won't cost you money like it would with film.
     

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