Using Macro Filters

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by mhr512, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. mhr512

    mhr512 TPF Noob!

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    I just got some macro filters off ebay and was wondering if anyone has worked with them before?

    They certainly are hard to focus when mounted to my 18 - 55 5.6G when the camera is not mounted and the depth of field seems inconsistent. Maybe just because I got some cheap crap off ebay? Perhaps anyone has some tips?

    I have the following equipment to work with:

    18-55 5.6G
    55-200 5.6G
    35 1.8G
    1X, 2X, 4X, and 10X filters
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2010
  2. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You will have a very close focus distance, so your camera will work harder.
    What focal length are you using?

    Generally, you would want to use these on fixed focal length lenses.
     
  3. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Chances are you do have some very cheap diopters there (the "proper" name for macro filters since they don't really filter the light in the traditional sense) however whilst their image quality might be suspect you can certainly learn valuble skills with them.

    If you want a recomendation the canon 500D (its a diopter name as well as a camera model) as well as the Raynox series of macro doipters are all good highquality choices on offer and some are not too costly (eg raynox DCR 150 and DCR 250).

    As for shooting with them you will get more magnification the longer the focal length you use, but I suspect the 18-55mm will be the best lens to use them with - the 35mm might give you the best image quality (since its a prime lens) but the focusing distances will be very small - whilst the 18-55 might have a more workable distance to focus with.

    Aside from the small focusing distances you will also have a small depth of field as well, you can counter this by using a smaller aperture - f8 through to f13 are good apertures to consider for this sort of work. The other skill is mastering the use of that small depth of field in ones work. You also have to balance the lighting as well - often flash is used for macro work if you don't have the chance to work from a tripod.
     

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