UV Filter suggestions?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by prodigy2k7, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There are many diff types of TV filters. (Didnt know that; other than diameter size)
    How can a filter (on b&h) be worth $150!?!? Thats a lot!

    Im looking for 58mm UV and polarizer filters. I dont want most expensive but I dont want dirt cheap. Any suggestions? (Screw on filters)
     
  2. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    Well, there is quite a wide range of opinions on UV and polarizing filters.

    One view is that the best UV filters will protect from UV rays and the blue haze that developes in the distance of some landscape shots. Others say that any lens that is multi-coated will protect against UV rays and the only use of a UV filter is to keep smudges, fingerprints, and rain droplets off the lens.

    Some say that the best polarizer transmits a lot of light, reflects very little, is made of great glass, is muticoated, thin, and resistant to breakage. Others will say that the differences caused by image quality between different filters are very minor and inconsequential. Even Popular Photography has suggested that the advertising of filters DESIGNED for digital cameras are more advertising hype than true differences between film and digital filters.

    The question in my mind is: Can the differences between expensive filters and cheap filters be quantified in lab reviews? Would viewers be able to pick out which filter was used for which shot?

    skieur
     
  3. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There have been a few threads of people initially complaining of the lack of image quality out of their lens.... they then later posted improved results after removing their UV filter. I wonder if they were using cheap or expensive filters...

    B+W for me (usually).. no issues so far..
     
  4. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Do you really have a ferrari? lol
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    How can it cost that much? Do you know the process involved in multicoating something? Like expensive sunglasses etc? High temperatures, vacuum bake, a 100% even application. It's no longer just a piece of glass. :er:
     
  6. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    I've always been partial to the Tiffens. Hoyas, on the other hand:puke:
     
  7. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yeh.. and I have Canon 1200mm f/5.6 too... ;-)

    PM me.. got a bridge to sell yah.
     
  8. WDodd

    WDodd TPF Noob!

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    I have a couple B&W UV filters and a Hoya CPL and I like them both never had any problems.
     
  9. Ben-71

    Ben-71 TPF Noob!

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    In some conditions, there would be no visible difference between a top quality filter and a cheep one. In other situations, it may make a difference - and that would, obviously, happen in that one in a lifetime shot... :)

    For top quality, at lower prices, try Heliopan filters, at
    CHRISTOPH GREINERPHOTO
    Send a Mail to Sandra, at - info@greiner-photo.de





     
  10. JustAnEngineer

    JustAnEngineer TPF Noob!

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    I notice a bit less flare when shooting into the sun with a multi-coated Crystal Optics UV filter than I do with the single-coated Canon UV filter. My only B&W ($$$) filter is a 77mm slim circular polarizer. It seems great so far.
     
  11. Ben-71

    Ben-71 TPF Noob!

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    Indeed, when there's a light source in the frame, the difference between a top quality multi-coated filter and all others, reveals itself in full.

    The Greiner Mail which I posted, is in Germany.
    I addressed them following a recommendation on the Internet, and by now, after 2 shipments, I can pass on the recommendation from first-hand experience.
    They speak English, and are both nice and meticulous.
    Some of what they supply is cheaper than in the US, some is more expensive.
    They would become even more attractive when the $ gets its head up again.

    BTW, there's sales-talk about "Filters for Digital". which I don't 'buy'.
    The only 'digital-dedicated' filter can be one that blocks both UV and IR,
    to which sensors are sensitive (in spite of having an IR blocking layer).
    I tried, and, in complete darkness, my D300 took nice shots, of a NIR
    (Near Infra Red) light source.
    However - except for some unique situations - the natural IR is so many f-stops lower than the "normal" light, that it doesn't change hues.

    I took quite a few shots w/ & w/o a B+W UV-IR blocking filter.
    So far, the effect of IR blocking wasn't visible.
    I'll be able to test it again next month, on green vegetation at an
    extremely hot weather in a desert.
     
  12. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It's marketing fuzz, don't waste your day. IR filters are tailored to the lens. Look at the Canon 350D would you say it takes unbelievably nicer photos than a D70? A website I found listed the exposure value of bright scenes through Hoya R72 filters. The Canon 350D was around 1EV the D70 was around 7.5EV.

    It is false to say sensors are sensitive to IR light. THat's a very small part of a large graph that would have to show HOW sensitive compared to the visible range. Just like film is sensitive to UV light but I've not NEEDed a UV filter for my film camera beyond standard lens protection.
     

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