UV Filter

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by danalec99, May 3, 2004.

  1. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    a) Is a UV Filter a bare necessity for a lens?
    b) What is its function?
    c) Does each lens have unique filters?
     
  2. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    A It really depends on what you are doing with your photos. A UV filter is not a necessity for a lens. It more for protection than anything else. If you're worried about banging up a lens or cracking it or something, then a UV filter is a good idea. (i'd rather bust a $20 filter than a several hundred dollar lens). On the other hand the more glass you put inbetween an image and your film/sensor the lower quality image you get. A UV filter has very little effect on the image. The quality loss is hardly noticeable unless yoo make it really big.

    each lens does have a unique filter connection, sort of. They're all (as far as i've seen theres probably an exception out there somewhere) screw on, but the size of the filter ring varies between lenses.
     
  3. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks tr. Does it protect the lens from dust?
     
  4. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Sure, but then you have a dusty filter instead of a dusty lens. ;)
     
  5. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    But I assume the filter would be less expensive and can be cleaned. If not get another one.

    Wont you be hurt to see unwanted dust on your lens? :)
     
  6. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Sorry, just being a smart ass. ;) Yes, the filter is cheaper, and if you were to damage it while cleaning it, it would be much less of a bummer than if you did the same to your lens. But you still need to take care of the filter. Anything on it, such as dust, fingerprints, etc, can affect the pictures the same as if they were on the lens itself.
     
  7. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    And most dust can just be wiped off.
    If you shoot indoors, the UV filter doesn't really do anything other than protection. Outdoors it can cut through haze a little. Not quite as well as the darker filters, but it doesn't effect the color or exposure much so you can just leave it on all the time.
     
  8. malachite

    malachite Heavily Medicated For Your Protection

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    For me, UV filters are great when your not using your lens as most damage occurs during storage/transport. Every lens I have has a UV/Skylight filter on it when it's being totted around in my bag but off it goes when it's picture time. A little anal retentive I know, but I have lenses that are 10 years old that I could sell today and honestly claim them mint.

    I've done a few workshops and this subject has come up in everyone of them. Rohn Engh actually started out a workshop I took telling everybody to "take that damn thing off". It's always the same thing 'Why put $10 worth of cheap plastic/glass in front of an exspensive lens?'

    I even go one step further by just writing the mm size right on the front of the thing with a permanent marker so I remember to take it off and it's easier to find in the bottom of your camera bag :p
     
  9. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    What a great idea! :D :idea: :!: :!: :!:

    I will put it in application ASAP. Thanks mal!
     
  10. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone for the info.

    So, how do we go about shopping these filters?? Are there different brands??

    Lead me!
     
  11. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    If you are just going to use it as a lens-cap, it might be better just to spend the money on a really good lens cap itself. You run less of a risk of messing up the threads on the end of the lens if you aren't taking the filter on and off all the time.

    There are different brands and sizes. Many of the Canon lenses use 58mm, including the 50mm f1.4. I shoot with one on all of the time, since I'm not the most graceful person and my photography isn't the kind that will be impacted much by the extra layer of glass. If my lens smacks into something, I'd rather have the filter get scratched or dented than have to pay for a new lens.
     

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