UV protector

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by flyin-lowe, May 27, 2009.

  1. flyin-lowe

    flyin-lowe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    6
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    My camera kit came with 2 Tiffen brand UV protector/filters. I am sure they are the cheapies coming with the kit. Should I use these or not. I am sure it would be more for protection then anything. I am planning on getting lens hoods for my two lenses and figure they will do me more good then these. What do you think?
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,225
    Likes Received:
    5,003
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Lens hoods are good. They provide lens protection, improve the contrast of your images, and reduce problems with lens flare.

    UV filters when they shatter become shards that can gouge your lens objective. The extra air gap promotes lens flare, they don't add to image contrast and if you prang the filter threading ring with a UV attached it can make removing the UV filter from your lens very difficult.

    UV filters are promoted by camera sellers because they are a high profit item, just like fast food places push their french fires and soda pop because they are high profit items.

    UV filters don't protect all that much and fries and soda pop aren't good for your health.
     
  3. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,601
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Location:
    State of Confusion
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Your best bet is to try them out in different lighting conditions. Harsh sunlight is probably the best test for loosing image quality, introducing flare, ghosting, etc.

    I rarely use UV filters. I don't even own a UV filter for my 77mm filter size lenses. But I always have the proper hood attached. It's a debatable issue.... half the room uses them, half of them don't and the other half don't know what we're talking about. :biggrin:
     
  4. SrBiscuit

    SrBiscuit TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    NH
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    im so scared of bumping my glass on the corner of a table or something i use them out of fear.
     
  5. lockwood81

    lockwood81 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Daytona Beach
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    :thumbup:

    A lens hood is the way to go. (but thats just me)
     
  6. patrickt

    patrickt TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oaxaca, Mexico
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I use those lovely devices called lens caps. With digital I never use UV filters. Actually, the only filter I use is a polarizing filter occasionally on my wide-angle lens.
     
  7. dcclark

    dcclark TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Houghton, MI
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I just spent a couple of weeks playing around with a lens hood instead of a UV filter -- basically so that I could speak with somewhat more authority about their relative merits. I found the hood to be extremely annoying, got in the way, and eventually got lost (I'm hard on my equipment, it was sacrificed to the gods of a 150 year old mine).

    On the other hand, UV filters stay put. Yes, a shattered filter can scratch your objective element, but anything that shatters a filter would CERTAINLY scratch your objective element. Flare can be a problem with cheaper ones, but with decent multicoating, I haven't noticed any problems.

    As always, experiment and try for yourself. You know your style better than us, and you also know more about how much you care about safety vs. flare vs. all the other problems people have mentioned. My personal, informed, choice is to use UV filters.
     
  8. Sherman Banks

    Sherman Banks TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Rain City
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You shoot with a lens cap on? Probably have some underexposure issues huh? J/K. I'm sure you're probably referring to using the caps when not using the camera.

    Anyways, I have a UV filter on two of my lenses but they are unnecessary. They don't add anything to the quality of the shot (take away in most cases with low end filters), and you can get better protection from a lens hood which can protect from flare rather than increase it.
     
  9. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    4,820
    Likes Received:
    285
    Location:
    Montreal
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I'm in the group that uses the filters. But I don't use the cheapy filters that often come with kits. I also don't use the high filters. Maybe if I had high end glass, I'd use high end filters.

    I usually stick with a decent multi coated Hoya filter
     
  10. ANDS!

    ANDS! No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,178
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Downtown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A lens hood will provide "contrast" assistance only in the fact that you don't have a ton of light flopping all around your lens. Otherwise, a photograph with and without a lenshood in optimal lighting makes no difference.

    I will agree, it does provide a kick ass bit of protection. I have banged and elbowed my lens hood more times than not, and I would much rather it hit the lens hood than the lens.

    As for UV filters - theres no reason to not use them. I'd rather the filter crack then the lens should something get close enough to do so. Can a cracked filter scratch your lens element - sure, but the chances of it being a DEEP enough scratch/cut to actually affect anything is minuscule.
     
  11. Mike1.6

    Mike1.6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Beautiful New England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I will add my vote to the no filter crowd, provided that you are using a hood. Especially in your case where the filters seem rather inexpensive. In that case, the filter can actually degrade the quality of the image.
     
  12. Sherman Banks

    Sherman Banks TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Rain City
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    True, but we're not talking about L glass here either so the degradation would be very minimal. What I would do is take the filters, put them on a white piece of paper and if you see a lot of tint or coloration, consider not using them. If the change is minimal, throw them on and use that as extra protection for the lens. Some cheaper filters have a pinkish grey color to them that is very hard to detect on most consumer grade glass so don't be too swayed by the image degradation issue on your lenses.
     

Share This Page