Wanna Make $100,000 a year?

Discussion in 'Articles of Interest' started by KmH, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's always amazing how certain people are in their opinions about their generation compared to the ones before or after it, and how little evidence they actually have to support any of those opinions. And yet, the spouting continues...

    As for a college education, don't expect them to go away any time soon just because there's some job growth in the service industry. Sure, there is the potential for high salaries in those fields, but a person is more likely to earn those top salaries if they have even a 2-year degree.

    And general education requirements aren't going anywhere either. I know it's oh-so-popular to disparage the value of these courses, but again, most lay criticisms are thrown out without any evidence to prove the supposed uselessness of the courses.


     
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  2. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It is not about money, but quality of life. (Lol). (Personally and Generally, lol, I don't think college should be about earning money. College should be about learning. College should be about chasing your desires and interests. College should be about advancing knowledge and the arts. If one can combine love of a major with employment then more power to you. That is called upping your quality of life.)
     
  3. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Millennial College Graduates: Young, Educated, Jobless
    More College Grads Finding Work, But Not in the Best Jobs
    College Graduates Struggle to Find Employment Worth a Degree
    ‘I don’t know what to do with my major’ and other reasons college grads can’t find jobs
    So Long, Middle Class: Middle-Income Jobs Are Disappearing the Fastest

    Colleges will not go away, but change in their education model, who and how they educate are inevitable in our more rapidly evolving society. Drs. Bruce K. Blaylock, Tal Zarankin, and Dale A. Henderson wrote an excellent article on the subject of restructuring the learning environment in the college system of education.
    The Higher Education Teaching and Learning Portal | Restructuring Colleges in Higher Education around Learning
     
  4. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Hate to disagree with you but, with total costs from $10- $100k per academic year (depending on the school), you better believe it's about the money. Sorry, I saw a lot of job applicants come in my door over the years with useless degrees, I for one believe encouraging a young person "to expand their horizon" with a degree that's totally unmarketable, while emptying (theirs & their parents) pocket of thousands of dollars, is wrong.
     
  5. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I understand your point. I used to agree with it more, but recently, I've been changing my mind. College is certainly about all those things, but for it to be only that is a luxury for most people. Gone are the days when college served to create well-rounded individuals fit for polite society. It's much more utilitarian these days. The fact is, there is room for both purposes.
     
  6. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I think it's disingenuous to think of a person's degree as "useless" because it doesn't fit into the job description. Inappropriate for the context, perhaps, in some cases, but not useless.
     
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  7. SoulfulRecover

    SoulfulRecover Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Not sure where I am going with this but; I wanted to go to a community college when I was 18 because I had no idea what I wanted to do. My fathers exact words were "No kid of mine is going to a community college" so I ended up paying out of state tuition going to Colorado State. I was lucky and my grandfather left my siblings and I money which was then invested into Apple and Dell. My brother and sister wasted away their money on fun things. I was responsible and paid for my tuition. (Had I just held onto the stock till now, I wouldn't have to worry about working) I was there for three years and found that I enjoyed photography. No photo program there so I transferred back to Austin to go to the Art Institute. All my tuition money was used up in those 3 years because of being an out of state student.

    Went for a couple semesters, dropped out. Family issues meant I was "homeless" so I moved into my friends place. He got me a job working at a dealership for $8 an hour. It was a job and managed to get myself to the point of having enough money to get my own place. Barely though. I lived in "low income housing" and could only afford to eat noodles for dinner. It was rough but hell, I had my own place. I took classes for work with the promise of a raise but it never came. 5 years at the same job, kicking ass and still 8 an hour.

    During that time I went back to the Art Institute to continue photography and I loved it. Got to the point on 23k of debt and knew if it was any more, I wouldn't be able to pay it off. Its 80k to get a photo degree from them. Its insane. So I dropped out again.

    My now wife's boss's best friend was looking for a new accountant for his office. I resisted because I didn't want to be behind a computer but the dealership pissed me off so I left and took the accounting job. I knew nothing of it but was taught and now my boss is paying for my education as long as I pass my classes. I make salary (32k) have 3 weeks paid vacation, Christmas bonus and raises every year. I do not like my job but it provides so I do it.

    So between the wife and I we make more than the average income for our area. Being placed into the entitled Millennial category because of my age really sucks. I do not feel I am apart of "their" culture as I am closer in age to Gen X but even that's pointless.

    My question is who's pocketing all this tuition money??? Instead of trying to not pay your tuition, people should be trying to figure out why the cost is so high to begin with. The teachers don't make anything. Is all the money going to sports? Why? Shouldn't the money go to education?

    I have friends in my field of work and they make twice what I do because they have a degree. No idea what their student loans are like though
     
  8. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Read this: The Invisible Force Behind College Admissions
     
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  9. SoulfulRecover

    SoulfulRecover Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Very good read. Thank you for posting. Its nuts that its operated in such a way but I guess a business is a business and money is king.

    Schools do a very poor job of informing the students what the various loans mean too and how theyre paid back. Basically I remember them just saying "heres loan 1 and loan 2. Now sign here" then scooted me out the door. Always slow to pay me but as soon as I owed $1, they would yell and scream about getting their money.
     
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  10. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Something that was still going when I was kid were the Apprenticeship Programs, for skilled trades. Then it kind of died away as not being cool. I've been pleasantly surprised in recent years to see a reemergence of the it as a partnership between the state and business. We've had a lot of industry move in (automotive, aerospace) that require skilled employees. Classroom training, followed by OJT is providing opportunities for not only young people but adults seeking to earn a decent living. It's a shame that it isn't being expanded for other fields.

    @limr a very wise and successful businessman took me under his wing as a mentor during my college years. His words still hold meaning. "A degree in anything doesn't qualify you for a job, it provides a foundation to build on". The "useless" degrees I referred to earlier were "general studies" with nothing to build on, and no job experience.
     
  11. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    But this still assumes that the only purpose for a degree is to train someone very specifically for a specific job. It dismisses the value of the critical thinking, research, and communication skills, for example, that are often hallmarks of liberal art curricula, and are often much more applicable to the 'real world' than most people realize. There are very few degrees that have built-in "job experience" (internships or clinical work, for example.) Otherwise, one gets job experience from, y'know, having a job.
     
  12. waday

    waday Do one thing every day that scares you Supporting Member

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    My few cents:

    In my field especially (engineering), it seems as if a bachelor's degree is increasingly being seen as "not enough". Master's degrees are now typically preferred. One problem is that there isn't much of a pay difference between bachelor's and master's. But, I guess you make it up in marketability.

    Too bad they don't generally teach "marketability" to college students. Let alone what "billability" means, or the fact that they'll be writing reports more than they'll be designing.

    Also, there are a considerable number of people that are no longer retiring and are staying around as long as they can. This puts a burden on us younger folk who are now having difficulty with upward mobility and taking on additional responsibilities that are no longer being passed down to us. Some of these soon-to-be retirees are even refusing to help teach and mentor these younger folk (likely for obvious reasons for being replaced). Problem is that hurts all of us.

    It's not the same everywhere, but I've noticed this in at least three different companies I've worked for.

    No longer can college graduates start in the mail room and become CEO. We have to jump from job to job every few years to get pay bumps and different titles. Otherwise, you stay at the same level and, if you're lucky, get a 1-3% raise. Sometimes I didn't get a raise. In the last 8 or so years, I've worked for 3 different companies. It was the only way for me to increase my pay AND increase my level of responsibility (despite the company being an international company with the "ability" to move and work on various projects.. ha!).

    As a side note: You want to be a factory worker without a degree? Sometimes that's not enough, either.
     

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