Wanna Make $100,000 a year?

Discussion in 'Articles of Interest' started by KmH, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    @limr read my post "A degree in anything doesn't qualify you for a job, it provides a foundation to build on". There's not a big demand for free thinkers in the world without some basic understanding of the field they are entering, unless it's the government, and we all know how that's worked out. If the only thing you have to offer is a general studies degree and nothing else, would you want to go to a doctor who's assisting nurse has no basics? How about an accountant who lets a "free thinker with good communication skill" and no accounting basics, do you income tax?


     
  2. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I didn't say "free thinker"; I said "critical thinking." Again, you are assuming that a general liberal arts curriculum is not providing a foundation. It's not all heads-in-the-clouds stuff they're learning. And what general studies graduate is applying for nursing or accounting jobs? Of course that's not what I'm talking about. If that is happening, then it still doesn't mean that the degree is useless, but, as I originally said, "inappropriate for the context." There could be many reasons the person is applying for a job for which he or she is not trained, but it's still disingenuous to call their degree "useless" just because they're applying for the wrong jobs.

    I'm talking about a person who graduated with a degree in, for example, humanities but applies for entry-level business positions and doesn't get hired because the assumption is that the person has no "useful" skills when in fact, many of the skills can transfer to a business environment.
     
  3. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Sadly, it seems that higher education is less about education and more about making money.

    Another issue is the shift in faculty make up.
    College Professors: Before You Teach, Learn How!
    More Than Half of College Faculty Are Adjuncts: Should You Care?

    At the university I attended in the early 70's most of the instructors were full time employees of the university. Most of them were also carrying a large class load. Their office hours were necessary as it was usually the only time they weren't in the classroom. 65% of expenditures by 2 & 4 year institutions is for salaries alone these days. Surprisingly 35% are for non teaching positions.

    I am personally familiar with several instructors at that same university that teach only one or two classes.
     
  4. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    My adult kids have found this out as well. Both went back after their MBA. One is accountant, one is the head of and IT department.

    No longer can college graduates start in the mail room and become CEO. We have to jump from job to job every few years to get pay bumps and different titles

    Unfortunately this hasn't changed all that much. I was taught from the beginning never stay at a company less than 2 years (or you'll be called a job jumper) or more than 5 (or they forget about you). Oldest son worked for a large Federal court system in one state in IT for 15 years and had stagnated. Took a job at a larger Federal court system in another state for a lot more pay and rapidly moved up the ladder to the IT Manger, and already eyeing Administrative Deputy Clerk spot. Had he stayed in the old spot he would still be in the toilet.
     
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  5. ClickAddict

    ClickAddict No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Actually, that was a major issue that Universities in at least our province have worked to overcome. Many of the faculties have developped "Co-Op" type programs or other work related internships.

    My son right now is working an 8 month term after about 4 terms of study (he studied through his first summer after year 1 and only started his work term in January). Then back to school for probably 8 months before being back to another work term. Will add about 1-2 years of university life, but once he's graduated he should have about 2 years worth of Practical job experience in his field.

    computer Science, Engineering, Nursiong, Teaching... all have long ago developed internships. I've heard many of the business programs have some now as well (not sure how well implemented they are yet)

    There's big money to be had in education so they are not sitting around on old ways... they are listening and adapting as much as they can.
     
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  6. waday

    waday Do one thing every day that scares you Supporting Member

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    Glad to hear that he's moving up after changing jobs! I've found the same. I'm moving into more of a managerial role, which would not have happened at my last job. As you very correctly put it, I was "forgotten" after about 5 years. I was only remembered when I quit.
     
  7. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    @waday sometimes the forgetfulness isn't intentional. Sometimes you simply hit a barrier with a company, as in there isn't anywhere to go above you, until someone else is promoted, fired, or retires.
     
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  8. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, I'm aware that there's a push to include more "experiential" or "applied" learning opportunities and requirements into programs that traditionally didn't have them previously (I was on a committee ;) ). The other buzzword term is "guided pathways" especially in community colleges. It's all a push to drive not just enrollment in programs but completion and entry into the workforce.

    So yes, in the future, there will be more new graduates who apply for their first jobs with more job experience, like you have in many more technical, skill-oriented, STEM field majors.

    But even so, general education requirements aren't going to go by the wayside, nor should they. They still teach valuable "soft" skills that are needed in the workplace. A college education should still mean that a person is not just learning job skills and knowledge, but is also learning critical thinking, communication, autonomy...it should give a person a broadened perspective on the world. Even the most skill-oriented college program is not the same as (and should not be the same as) a program at a trade school or apprenticeship.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
  9. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Robots are already taking over many service jobs. There are even robotic surgery suites in some hospitals, so even surgeons can be replaced by robots.

    Plumbers, electricians, HVAC techs are all going to lose their jobs to robots in the not distant future.
    Those systems will be designed by robots to facilitate the use of robots to install and repair them.
    For a short time humans will still be needed to repair the older systems still in use, but robots will quickly be able to repair even those systems.

    So the real question becomes - As robots proliferate, how will people make enough money to live?
     
  10. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Well I doubt that either you or I will live to see this happen. I have had two surgeries in the "robotic surgery" suites. Surgeons are not going anywhere, well except to the chair to operate the robot. The surgeon still performs the surgery, they are however assisted by the robotic machine the surgeon operates. The robotic machine can be more precise in it's movements than the human hands. It still takes 2 surgeons to conduct the operation as well as the anesthesiologist, and surgical nurses.

    I seriously doubt we will see robotic HVAC, electrical or plumber robots coming to our homes. The robots used in all of those professions are assembly robots. They can perform the same repetitive movement faster and more accurately than humans and don't need bathroom breaks, lunch breaks or 8 hour work days. They still need humans to program their operations. Rosie from the Jetsons is still just a TV cartoon.
     
  11. Vtec44

    Vtec44 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    What are we talking about again? :D
     
  12. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Looks like this thread is............................

    not-dead-yet.jpg
     

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