Water in Motion

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by agrteknolan, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. agrteknolan

    agrteknolan TPF Noob!

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  2. TrickyRic

    TrickyRic TPF Noob!

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    Pretty impressive to say you had no tripod! You have some over exposed areas due to the longer exposure for which I'd recommend an ND filter, if you're wanting to play more with these kind of shots.
     
  3. agrteknolan

    agrteknolan TPF Noob!

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    Thank you,
    Even more impressive was the 8 month old strapped to my chest!
    [​IMG]

    Yeah, I can only do so much by stopping down and lowering the iso, I'll be picking up an ND soon (Snow shots).
     
  4. agrteknolan

    agrteknolan TPF Noob!

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  5. TrickyRic

    TrickyRic TPF Noob!

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    Again the over exposures let them down a little, but I love your compositions and as you say, sometimes hardware limitations take over.

    You could save them all with post processing. The way I'd do it would be, in GIMP (Photoshop if you prefer), use the Fuzzy select (Magic Wand in PS) to roughly select the over exposed areas, then apply a feather - in the resolutions above I'd use a feather of around 20 pixels but in the originals you'd want to increase that somewhat. Now with the selections in place, create a new layer and use the bucket fill to paint over your selections in a darker tone - eye-drop the surrounding better-exposed water for that. Now slide the opacity of this layer way down, until the colour merges nicely with the surroundings (That's what the feather is for, to gradiate the solid fill into the background colours). If you're lucky you'll get a nice exposure first time, otherwise repeat the process on various layers, possibly with various colour tones and feather sizes.
     
  6. agrteknolan

    agrteknolan TPF Noob!

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    Awesome, that works perfectly on all except the completely blow out areas, I'll have to remember to shot in raw next time so I have a little for control over the exposure on these shots.
     
  7. TrickyRic

    TrickyRic TPF Noob!

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    With enough layers, tones, and feather sizes it should be possible to fix even the completely blown out areas, at least to some extent. If the result looks too flat you could always stick some radial colour-to-transparent gradients down too, with very low opacity. You've just got to be careful not to over process.
     

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