Water in the Lens

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Commonman, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    I went up to the Mississippi headwaters this weekend and fell in with my Nikon FA3 lens attached to a Nikon EM body. I thought it was fine but then, to my horror, discovered that water had somehow gotten into the lens. It appears to be between the front (outside) lens and the lens that faces the inside of the camera which causes a fog like condition. Is it worth repairing? Can I repair it myself? Should I just write it off and purchase a new (used) Nikon lens?

    Note: at the time of the accident, I was using a Nikon EM body. Now the shutter sticks on that body and I am wondering what to do about that. But my primary concern is the lens, since I use it on my "good" Nikon (the FA3).

    Any advise would be much appreciated.
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Depends on the lens. If it's an old manual-focus prime you may be able to do it yourself. I have taken a few M42 lenses apart (not completely, but removed and cleaned elements) and it was fairly easy. The same may be possible with your lens but I don't know what it is.

    If you can't fix it yourself, then whether you should pay to have it repaired or write it off is a question of how much the lens is worth and how much it would cost to buy again... so again it depends on what the lens in question is... :)
     
  3. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    Gotta watch out for those Itascaites. They'll get 'cha before you even realize it.

    Have you let it sit for a while? Maybe it'll dry out on it's own.
     
  4. Dave V

    Dave V TPF Noob!

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    Not sure would it work but maybe sit it in front of a dehumidifier for a while, works with headlights in cars that condensate no reason why it soldn't work for the lens after all the water got in it has to have a way out!
     
  5. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    Everyone, thanks. I am trying something that a guy at my photo shop told me. I put it in a zip lock bag with some rice. I'll take a look at it tonight and see if it cleared up.

    Now this is a Nikkor E-series 50 mm lens 1:1:8. They go for about $25 -$50 so it probably is not worth paying to have it repaired. I think it is a "fast" lens, opening up to f 1.8 but I don't have the lens right here so I can't remember.

    My guy at the camera shop had a 35 mm Nikkor 2 f lens he was selling for $190. I would like to try this focal length for a while but I don't want to pay that much right now for a lens.
     
  6. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    It's been a day or so now and it's still fogged up. I may try to take it apart.
     

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